Thursday, June 27, 2019

Strangers on A Plane



HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN: Usually when you call something  “an airplane book” it means a book  that’s perfect reading for an airplane—riveting and distracting and compelling.

(Yes, I know it could also be about airplanes, or whatever. But go with me here.)

I love airplane books. And I love seeing what everyone else is reading on airplanes. (Lots of people still read book-books, my survey shows. Especially when there are no plugs on the plane.)

But this perfect airplane book, THE DEAD GIRL IN 2A, takes place on an airplane. Not completely, but the opening premise is so chilling that it’ll make you take a second look at the person sitting beside you.

Listen to this:

Jack Buchanan knows the woman sitting next to him on his business flight to Denver―he just can't figure out how he knows her. Clara Stowe isn't in Jake's line of work and didn't go to college with him. They have nearly nothing in common apart from a deep and shared certainty that they've met before. As their airplane conversation deepens, both struggle to figure out what circumstances could have possibly brought them together. Then, in a revelation that sends Jake reeling, Clara admits she's traveling to the Colorado mountains to kill herself, and she disappears into the crowded airport immediately after landing.

AHHH!  What would you do?  Carter Wilson, the author, didn’t start out to be a novelist.   What got him there? Boredom.

And then—something else. Something that applies to all of our lives.


"Not Enough Time" Is a Myth!

 As a bestselling author of six psychological suspense novels who also has a full-time job and family, I'm frequently asked, "how to you find the time to write?" I used to answer this vaguely, like I was some kind of superhuman who didn't know how to explain their innate powers. But it didn't take long to realize I wasn't special. I wasn't doing anything that anyone else isn't capable of. I was merely making choices that allowed me to do the things that made me happiest.

True, there are only twenty-four hours in a day. But that only matters if you choose to define your life as a series of days. But what if, rather than defining your life through time, you defined it though passion? Through the things that made you happy rather than the things you felt you had to do? What would that look like?

I have a formula for all this, and it doesn't factor in time as a variable at all. It's this:

PASSION + COMMITMENT = HAPPINESS

I didn't start writing until I was thirty-three, and, having no formal education in in the field, had no idea what I was doing. My writing career began on a single day when, in order to stave off boredom at a continuing-education class, I began writing a story. I wrote that story for two hours in the class, went home, then decided I had more to say. Three months later I had a 400-page manuscript. I remember writing that last line, sitting back, and thinking, what just happened? Is this what I'm supposed to be doing with my life? And, the biggest question of them all: now what?

I proceeded to learn the publishing industry, mostly through Google. What do I do with a completed novel? Find an agent. How do I do that? Write query letters. And so on. After seventy or so rejections I landed that agent. She shipped my book around to all the publishing houses, where it took about a year to be soundly rejected.

That last rejection represented an inflection point in my life. Two years earlier, I never would have conceived that I'd soon be writing a novel, landing an agent, and having my book rejected by all the publishing houses. With that final rejection, it was the time to define exactly what this life path was. Give it a name. Was this a whim, or was this a passion? Did writing make me happy?

Yes, I decided. It did.

So I found the time around my already busy life to write a second novel, which took a year to finish and another year to be rejected. As did books three and four. Finally, roughly eight years after that day in the classroom where I began my first story, I landed my first publishing deal with that fifth book. Since then, I've had four other novels published, a sixth releasing this July, have won numerous awards and have even hit the USA Today bestsellers list. And yet, I still have that full-time job. I've still managed to raise two wonderful if-slightly-deranged kids. I still spend cherished quality time with Jessica, my partner. I still manage to log 250 workouts a year.

It's not a miracle. It's not some secret time-management technique. I do all those things because I have a passion for them all. I love writing, my job, my kids, Jessica, and exercise. Make the things you are passionate for your priority, and the rest will slip away. And there's this added benefit: focusing on things that make you happy will naturally result in spending less time on things that don't. For me, those things include obsessing over the news, wasting hours on social media, and reading books or watching shows with which I'm not fully engaged.

When people say, "I don't have the time," it's usually just an excuse. What they really mean is they don't want to prioritize something into their life because it's less important to them than other things. Sure, sometimes there's literally not enough time to do something even if you love it (like writing a book in a week), but if you really wanted to do something, like master the guitar, you could do it. It could take years, but that doesn't matter. Define your life through passion, not time.

Yes, my days are full. I get up at 5am, work out, write, get the kids to school, go to work, come home, write some more, spend quality time with my family, and then I'm in bed around 10pm. I can't write a novel in three months anymore; it takes a year.

Which leads me to the second part of the equation. Commitment. You can be passionate all you want about something, but if you don't throw yourself fully into something, the happiness you seek around that thing will never be fully realized. Many instances when I sit down to write, there is no muse guiding me. No sense of losing time as my fingers take control of my brain and the story magically unfolds. Lots of times writing sucks, feeling more like a low-level data-entry job than crafting a piece of creative fiction. But I have to sit in that chair every day, seven days a week, because for all the times it's not fun, I know I'm an overall happier person for it.

Next time you actually use the phrase, "I don't have any time," catch yourself and think about what it is you really mean. Do you not have the time, or do you not have the passion? Asking yourself that simple question might reshape how you view what it means to be happy.

Passion plus commitment equals happiness. It can be that easy.
  
HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN: Yup, I so agree! But I still wonder about the person sitting next to me on the plane. And all the stories flying with me. Stories I’ll never know.

Did you ever meet someone life-changing on a plane?

And a copy of THE DEAD GIRL IN 2A to one lucky commenter!


THE DEAD GIRL IN 2A
   coming July 2 from Sourcebooks
Jake Buchanan knows the woman sitting next to him on his business flight to Denver—he just can’t figure out how he knows her. Clara Stowe isn’t in Jake’s line of work and didn’t go to college with him. They have nearly nothing in common apart from a deep and shared certainty that they’ve met before. Despite their best efforts over a probing conversation, both struggle to figure out what circumstances could possibly have brought them together. Then, in a revelation that sends Jake reeling, Clara admits she’s traveling to the Colorado mountains to kill herself, and disappears into the crowded airport immediately after landing. 

The Dead Girl in 2A is the story of what happens to Jake and Clara after they get off that plane, and the manipulative figure who has brought them together decades after they first met. Intensely creepy, beautifully written, and full of Carter Wilson’s signature whom-can-you-trust paranoia, this is a psychological thriller unlike any you’ve read before.


ABOUT CARTER WILSON
USA Today and #1 Denver Post bestselling author Carter Wilson explores the depths of psychological tension and paranoia in his dark, domestic thrillers. Carter is a two-time winner of the Colorado Book Award and his novels have received multiple starred reviews from Publishers Weekly, Booklist, and Library Journal. Carter’s bestselling, critically acclaimed standalone thrillers include MISTER TENDER’S GIRL; REVELATION; THE COMFORT OF BLACK; THE BOY IN THE WOODS; and FINAL CROSSING. He has also contributed short fiction to various publications, and most notably was featured in the R.L. Stine young-adult anthology, Scream and Scream Again. Born in New Mexico, Carter now lives outside of Boulder, Colorado in a Victorian house that is spooky but isn’t haunted…yet.






86 comments:

  1. Congratulations on your newest book, Carter . . . I must say it sounds rather creepy and I’m looking forward to seeing how everything works out for Jake and Clara.

    Alas, I’ve never had a life-changing meeting on a plane. Of course, if I actually managed to strike up a conversation with anyone sitting near me, I just might have a different answer . . . .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So are you like me, and actively avoid talking to people? :-)

      Delete
    2. Good morning! I must admit, I usually just slip on my headphones and avoid all talk. But sometimes I engage. You never know when you'll meet that person who will say something to change your life.

      Delete
    3. So true, Hank. I am not at all good at starting conversations with people I don't know; on airplane flights, I usually just sit down, buckle the seat belt, and open my book . . . .

      Delete
  2. Wow, Carter, you've given me a lot to think about. "Define your life through passion, not time." That's a great way to live your life. And, I've been using the time excuse for far too long about exercise. I'm beginning to fear that not making time for the exercise is going to give me less time in the end. I've cut back on social media time lately, partly due to being out of town and partly due to just being tired of falling down the rabbit hole that it is. I'm finding that I don't miss it as much as I thought I would. I'm glad you found your passion of writing, and I am putting The Dead Girl in 2A on my TBR list. It's a clever title and a fascinating scenario. What an overwhelming responsibility to have someone tell you that she is going to kill herself. Oh, and great cover, too.

    I've had some interesting conversations on planes. One of my favorites was the guy who told me that he had been with some friends hanging around a carnival in the east when who comes along but Stephen King. He wanted to talk to some locals about the carnival and talked to this guy. It was research for his book Joyland. And, Hank, I love to see what people are reading on planes, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Such a cool story! And I can understand why he wanted to tell it :-)

      I so agree with you about the rabbit hole, Kathy… Not quite sure how to handle it. Xx

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your comments, Kathy. My advice is to prioritize exercise. Give yourself a two-week challenge and try to establish a routine. The benefits are mental as well as physical.

      Delete
  3. What you've said makes a lot of sense. I know if I were to decide to write a novel, I'd have to give up a lot of my other hobbies to do it, things I really enjoy. So it's not a high enough priority for me. But I am thankful for people like you who do make it a high priority since that gives me something to read and enjoy.

    And I'm hooked by the premise of this new book. I've got to know what is going on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark, Your life seems perfect just the way it is!

      Delete
    2. Agreed, Hank. Mark, sounds like you've found balance.

      Delete
  4. I met someone life changing on a long-distance bus, not a plane, but it was a positive experience, not a mysterious one.

    I did something similar, Carter, in terms of finding that I loved to write fiction and prioritizing it in my life. In my case, my kids were out of the house and I was a lot older. After a few years of shoehorning everything in, I took the plunge to write mysteries full time and am so glad I did. My 18th novel released on Tuesday! Best of luck with your new one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds like a possible blog, Edith! And congratulations!

      Delete
    2. Wow, 18 novels. That's incredible, Edith. Congrats!

      Delete
    3. Thanks to you both! Started writing #23 today. ;^)

      Delete
  5. I have not had any life-changing meetings on a plane. I can't even remember talking much to the people around me the times I've flown. Guess I must have been lost in my airplane books! The Dead Girl in 2A sounds fascinating though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it is so easy just to be immersed in a book… Having a great book on an airplane is such a treat!

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Marla - enjoy the book!

      Delete
  6. I've not had any life-changing airplane moments, either, although I've fantasized about joining the Mile High Club. But that ship has sailed.

    Kudos on the new book and having the talent, determination and discipline to keep writing until someone accepted your manuscript. I can't even imagine how difficult those first few years were. I've added it to the tbr list.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blushing! But seriously, why would that be anything but uncomfortable and embarrassing? Maybe I am just not romantic enough :-)

      Delete
    2. Agreed, uncomfortable and embarrassing. And those bathrooms...gross.

      Delete
  7. Congratulations on your new release! I waited until the youngest was off to college before hunkering down to write a mystery. I've never looked back.

    With the exception of a six seat flight from Boston to Hyannis when I rode in the co-pilot's seat ("you can sit there if you don't touch anything"), I've never had an airplane seat close to 2A--usually it's 27A. I always check out what people are reading (time for a memorial edition of Judith Krantz's books?) and start a long flight with a paperback for every 2.5 hours of flying time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, the paperback math! I have never heard that, but very wise! So horrible to run out of book.

      Delete
    2. My dream is to catch someone reading one of my books on a plane. Hasn't happened...

      Delete
    3. Mine, too! I've seen people reading book by my pals--and sometimes I even ask if I can take a photo to send to them. It'll happen, Carter!

      Delete
  8. Ha! Love the premise of the novel. This is indeed a new definition of an airplane book. No Mile High Club for me, either, Ann.

    I travel a lot, and I've met a ton of really nice people on planes... most of the time I love to chat. (Never have been able to actually work on a plane though I hopefully bring my computer along.) But not life changing for either of us.

    Carter, was there a real encounter that spared this idea?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I’d love to hear that answer!

      Delete
    2. Alas, no, not a real encounter. But, if you have a few minutes, you should check out this story of when I actually met a girl in 2A, AFTER I wrote the book!

      https://mailchi.mp/c9cf5b6fddf4/june2019-the-day-i-met-the-dead-girl-in-2a?e=[UNIQID]

      Delete
    3. That is the BEST story ever! And you tell it so perfectly--hilarious. That would be a tough conversation, and I agree, a difficult task to decide exactly how to bring that up. But she doesn't seem as humorless in the photo as she does in the convo--and hey, I bet she went right to a book store and bought it (not wanting to impose on you)--and think of how many times she's probably told the story!

      Delete
    4. It was such a bizarre day. Maybe she remembers it, maybe she doesn't...but I knew I had to talk to her.

      Delete
  9. Pretty sure I haven't had any life-changing meetings on a plane. Maybe that is something to look forward to.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Gosh, so funny! I’ve had lots of interesting conversations on planes, though I will admit I actively try to avoid them, and be in my writing bubble. Planes are one of my favorite places to write, because I can totally focus.

    ReplyDelete
  11. My best experience it was with a man who was going to talk to me no matter what void and some methods I used… he just wanted to talk. So I finally told myself: Hank, be a person, you can talk to someone. Turned out he was a creative consultant, and taught me about emergent design. It was life-changing! And now I’m thinking… I’m going to write a blog about this. ( but it wasn’t scary… I have to admit, I have never had an encounter that felt mysterious or scary. It’s such a disturbing thought. )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's a great blog story, Hank. I once sat next to a priest flying from Poland to New York and we ended up debating the existence of God. It was a surreal experience. He was extremely open-minded, empathetic, and engaging.

      Delete
    2. Oh, an a PLANE. Why does that seem even more complex? Oh, Heaven. xoox

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  12. Hi Carter. Very good advice about passion + commitment = happiness. Where does duty factor into the equation?
    As a retired air line employee my first thought learning about your book was: "Oh! the girl is flying in first class with an aisle seat. Lucky her". Just reserved the title, will find out if seating has anything more to do with your interesting premise.
    My life changing experience came from flying for the first time. I loved it so much that I knew I wanted to be part of the travel industry. Growing up where they made airplanes pointed me towards this of course. Sorry this is disjointed, the coffee has not kicked in yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good question about duty. I know a lot of people who work jobs they hate out of a sense of duty (mostly for need of money). There's nothing wrong with duty. But I used to always think about my obituary (hopefully many years from now). Did I want it to read "he worked for 50 years as a real estate appraiser"?

      Delete
    2. Yup, first class, aisle seat. The best. xoxo . Wait--2A is window. Isn't it?

      Delete
  13. Carter--you're a new author on my horizon--and I'm already anxious for Clara and wondering how the heck could they know each other but not remember? Why?? I need to know!

    I like to talk to people on planes, surprisingly enough--because I'm on the introverted side. I use books when there's no one to talk with or else I really don't want my seatmates to continue talking to me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. An introvert who strikes up conversations on planes? Now that's intriguing!

      Delete
  14. AND THE WINNER from Yesterday of ONE SMALL SACRIFICE is: Cathy Akers-Jordan! Email me at h ryan at whdh dot com . YAAY! And now, back to the plane...

    ReplyDelete
  15. I don't know that I've ever met someone fascinating on a plane. I did sell a couple books to guys when I was standing in the cattle-call loading line for a flight once. Does that count?

    But I agree about time. I have two kids, a full-time job, and all the rest. But I still carve out my hour a day (at minimum) to work on my writing. Because that's my passion.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Congratulations on this intriguing novel. I fly rarely but have never had the occasion to meet someone fascinating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You never know where you will meet that fascinating person. I met someone at Starbucks once who I thought was a little "off" but it turned out to be a riveting conversation.

      Delete
    2. Fascinating person still to come. I spent an entire flight once thinking Harlan Coben was two rows ahead of me, and I couldn't decide whether to go say hi. I fretted and fretted. And finally, didn't. It wasn't him, as it turned out. :-)

      Delete
  17. In real life, meeting someone who confesses she's going to commit suicide would present such a dilemma!

    I've had lots of conversations on airplanes, but two stand out. One was with a seatmate on our way to NYC. We both lived in Cincinnati, and he invited me to see my first Broadway show with him. We dated once back home, and the chemistry didn't stick, but the love for Broadway sure did.

    The other experience didn't change my life, but it is still reverberating for my middle daughter, who lives in Boulder, and who works in the energy field. My former seatmate, about my age, works in the utilities sector, too, but in water, and we had such a stimulating conversation about worldwide water shortages. I mentioned my daughter and her work, and he gave me his card. She contacted him later, and they have met several times at national conferences. He has helped her in her career in small but critical ways.

    You just never know!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Those are great stories, Karen. And you know what? I live in Boulder!

      Delete
    2. Carter, I was flying to Denver to visit my daughter in Boulder on that flight!

      One of my favorite cities of all time, too.

      Delete
  18. A thoroughly interesting premise for a book, a real "I HAVE to know more" ides.And thanks for the insightful points about time use. Meeting people on a plane? Happens more to my husband, who is an outgoing sort. Weirdest ever? Flying to Rochester, many years ago, for a family visit. Guy next my husband, a real Brooklyn type, is going to Las Vegas for a vacation. From New York via Rochester is,to say the least, an odd route. He explained that "the boys" who were in travel hooked him up with a free ticket. And he liked Las Vegas because he is married to his boss's daughter and he needs to get that far away to fool around safely! My husband formed some interesting opinions about the line of work. What do you think? Or- another take - is that he was making it all up. But why? Hmmm.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is a weird one. Maybe he was making it up, but sounds like that guy was just a cretin.

      Delete
    2. My husband concluded that he was in organized crime. I'm sure I've forgotten a few more odd references.

      Delete
    3. Triss! Did you see that you won THOSE PEOPLE? Email me at h ryan at whdh dot com

      Ad you know...you cannot make that stuff up...xoo

      Delete
  19. This is so accurate. I am often asked how I manage to read and review as many books as I do. And my answer is much the same as Carter's. I prioritize my reading time over many other things - tv and social media being the biggest time-sucks for most people. I still have an very happy marriage, and active social life, several theater subscriptions, trips to conferences and vacations, a day job, and all those necessary things we all do (laundry, cleaning, sleeping [I could probably do with more of that], cooking [thankfully, the husband loves doing that], you get the point), but I include reading in that list of must-do things.

    Very few people can say "I don't have the time" and truly mean it. If something is important enough to you, you can always find even the briefest few moments to enjoy it every now and then. Like Carter says, what you really mean is "these other things are more important to me," which is fine as long as you realize you are making that choice.

    As for The Dead Girl in 2A, it is actually already on my to-be-read pile and I promise I will make time to read it! ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YAY! And yes, seems like you and Michael have this worked out perfectly! xx

      Delete
  20. You nailed it Kristopher! Make time for what fulfills you and the all the clutter will fall by the wayside.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I can't wait to read this book. Just reading the description of the book makes me want to really read it. I'm working on reading all of your books. I normally read books from the library, but when this one comes out I plan on buying it. I've got 2 of your books already. If only I had a time machine to go into the future to get the book already.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I wish I had a time machine, too! Then I'd know how the book I am trying to write turns out..xoxoo

      Delete
    2. Wow - I love it when a reader goes through all my works. It's so flattering! Thank you.

      Delete
  22. When I travel on planes, there are three important items I carry in my bag. 1)my eReader(because it also has my email, books, etc) but I don't want to use up my battery so 2)paperback book and 3)crocheting. The crocheting is for the wait time from security gate to boarding.

    Nothing exciting has happened while flying. I don't normally start conversations but will answer questions that usually come up from the crocheting, though most people ask what am I knitting...or that their grandmother used to do that.

    Passion vs "have to do it" - I'll need to remember that one for the next MD appointment when the suggestion to exercise will come up. My current goal is to walk further than from the car to the office. Still trying to reach that one goal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Goal-setting is key. Nearly everything I do is tied to some sort of goal.

      Delete
  23. Book sounds fascinating, looking forward to reading it. I always have a book with me when I'm traveling, especially on a plane trip. I've have never met any life changing people on a plane, maybe some day.

    ReplyDelete
  24. "Many instances when I sit down to write, there is no muse guiding me. No sense of losing time as my fingers take control of my brain and the story magically unfolds. Lots of times writing sucks, feeling more like a low-level data-entry job than crafting a piece of creative fiction. But I have to sit in that chair every day, seven days a week, because for all the times it's not fun, I know I'm an overall happier person for it."

    Carter, I'm going to print out these words and hand them to every writing student I have (and I should also tape them above my laptop as a reminder!)What you say here is so very true, and so little acknowledged. Writing is showing up and doing the work, sometimes for several books' worth, until you've taught yourself how to create a compelling story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup, perfect. Feelin' a li'l data entry myself today..

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Julia, I love that idea. Writing is a job!

      Delete
  25. I like your personal philosophy. Passion + commitment = happiness. Focusing on the things that are important to you and cutting out the things that are not important. I also enjoy having books with me when I travel. In fact, I normally bring 3-4 books with me when I am out of town to visit family so I have them to read before I go to sleep, also when I am waiting for or am on the plane. I take my mom to doctor's appointments when I am out of town to see her and the books are good companions while I am waiting. I have started bringing an extra (small suitcase) when I travel so I can put my books in and to carry back things for my family.
    Your book sounds very interesting. Planes give a physical intimacy which transcends to an emotional intimacy when the female character, Clara, states that she wants to end her life. We always want to help someone who is emotionally troubled and in pain to contemplate such a drastic choice. Then to loose that person in a setting that is beautiful, but can be deadly itself. The challenge to locate this person and help them where they could be anywhere in the mountains at a peril to yourself would make a very interesting book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, do we all imagine saving someone's life?

      Delete
    2. Agreed, Diane - there is a physical intimacy to planes that set the possibility for life-altering events.

      Delete
  26. Although I usually just talked to my traveling companions on planes, once a man told me that he was with a zoo accompanying a tiger in the cargo bay. I think Mile High Club is reserved for the private jets that they always have on soap operas.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I love talking to strangers on planed, in lines, doctor's office . . . anywhere we are forced to wait. So far, there have been no dramatic events, just pleasant connections. I was just telling friends at our Y-Stitch group about the mother who asked if I had made my water bottle holder and then asked if I'd mind helping her young daughter with her knitting. "See, I told you there'd be someone on the plane to help." Her grandma had been teaching her, and the end of the visit came too soon. Since I was on an exit row, there was space for them to sit cross-legged on the floor as we had our own knitting in public group. <3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary, do you find that most people are willing to engage, or do you get shut down a lot when you're trying to start a conversation?

      Delete
    2. Good question! As for me, I fear I am politely polite :-), but rarely hit the ball back.

      Delete
  28. Carter Wilson, welcome to Jungle Reds! And congratulations on your new book! The story about the lady planning to kill herself reminded me somehow of an Agatha Christie novel about a woman who was planning to kill herself (her child died and something happened to her husband?) and she was recruited by a British spy network to work for them. I think the Christie novel was 39 Steps. Not sure.

    Your novel sounds intriguing!

    Hank, good question. I met so many interesting people on plane rides. I once met the future Governor of Kansas who would NOT tell me which political party he was a member of (later I found out from newspapers that he was a Republican) LOL. I once met an elderly couple. The wife was knitting a beautiful baby blanket and I admired the blanket. Her husband tried to give me a Bible. LOL. I had an interesting conversation with a woman from Tennennesse about tobacco farms. I asked if it was possible to use tobacco for other things instead of people smoking and getting lung cancer. I once met a man who hated children and said he would only date women who wore size 4. He lied about working for a film production company. He asked me out and I said I have 4 children (not true). LOL . Sometimes when I fly, people sitting next to me want to sleep or are not interested in social chat. That is OK. I saw a blind man sitting in front with a seeing dog and he was also wearing hearing aids. Recently, I am seeing more and more people fly with emotional support dogs.

    Diana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like you've had a lot of interesting experiences! And thanks for the welcome, glad to be here.

      Delete
    2. Your life is so interesting! :-)

      Delete
    3. Carter, indeed, I had lots of interesting experiences.

      Hank, thanks! I appreciate your comment.

      Delete
  29. Congrats on what looks like a good book! I have only read books in which the meet cute happened on a plane. It has never happened to me!

    ReplyDelete