Tuesday, May 13, 2014

I Need A Hero...with a special Longmire Giveaway!



 JULIA SPENCER-FLEMING: Today's the day our friend Craig Johnson's latest Walt Longmire mystery, ANY OTHER NAME, hits the stores. Since the A&E series LONGMIRE is coming back for a second season, I assume there are a lot of people out there who've been introduced the Walt Longmire, but I (puts her hipster glasses on) have been crushing on Walt Longmire since Craig's first book, THE COLD DISH, came out ten years ago.

Walt Longmire is an example of the kind of hero I can't resist: fifty-something, laconic, tough-but-sensitive, knows his way around a gun but gets thrown by the women in his life. (People who read me may recognize certain similarities to my own male protagonist.) There are a lot of sigh-worthy heros in crime fiction, but what is it that makes them so? 


I got into an interesting discussion at Murder in Muskego a few years back on this point. I said it was competence - the sense that the hero could Do What Needed To Be Done with a minimum of fuss and bother. Tess Gerritsen opined it was being an alpha male that made the hero irresistable - women want to read about the man all other men defer to. Libby Hellman (IIRC) argued for sensitivity - a man whose emotions the reader can experience.
All of these? Something else? To reach the pinnacle of "Women want him, men want to be him," what qualities does the crime fiction hero need, Reds?

HALLIE EPHRON: Doesn't Take Himself Too Seriously and Has a Sense of Humor... those are my two. And Longmire, boy howdy! Does he qualify on both counts, especially in the novels. Ah, Likes Women... he's that, too.
And NEWS BULLETIN, Craig Johnson is going to be Guest of Honor at this fall's New England Crime Bake -- a wonderful conference for mystery writers and readers (set not in Wyoming but near Boston) which sells out fast... and registration is about to open! He'll on a bunch of panels, get the GOH interview treatment, as well as be on a panel of plot conjurers and we'll get to see how he does it. Registration should be opening later this week.
 
SUSAN ELIA MACNEAL: I love the kind of hero Craig Johnson and Julia write, but I'm also up for the deeply flawed protagonist who might not fit those criteria. The male protagonist I'm currently obsessed with is Buck Schatz, introduced in Daniel Friedman's, DON'T EVER GET OLD and now in DON'T EVER LOOK BACK. Buck's 88, moves with the aid of a walker, and has increasing issues with dementia. He's a curmudgeon, but I absolutely adore him. 


 

HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN: And Breaking News number two: the fabulous Craig Johnson is offering--just for today's Jungle Red commenters--THREE COPIES of his new book ANY OTHER NAME! So--just tell us about your heroes..and you're entered!

Here's me with the fab Craig Johnson last time he came to Boston..he's hilarious and tells wonderful stories. (He has a very cool wife, too.)
And Susan, I, too, am in love with Buck Schatz--he's so terrific. And right now I am delighted with Henry Swann, the poetry-reading skip tracer in Charles Salzberg's about to be released SWANN'S LAKE OF DESPAIR. Those familiar with this blog will remember my love of Inspector Morse. So I guess the thread for me in all of my favorite heroes is that they're smart. And wry.


RHYS BOWEN: My kind of hero has to be someone I can identify with. He or she has to have an innate goodness and desire to make things right. I'm a fan of the unlikely hero--Frodo in the Lord of the Rings--a little, insignificant person thrust into a role far beyond him but taking it on anyway. And retaining the self deprecating humor and basic humanity throughout. I think Louise Penny's Gamache is that sort of person. I hope that my heroines have just a tinge of it. 


DEBORAH CROMBIE: All of the above! Competent. Not necessarily outwardly tough, although I adore Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden. Likes women, yes, AND respects them. Sense of humor, check. Not taking themselves too seriously, check. And I love a bit of the eccentric--I haven't read the Buck Schatz books, or Henry Swann (putting on never-ending list) but I love Christopher Fowler's Arthur Bryant and John May.


Oh, and Walt Longmire is okay, too:-)





How about you, dear reader? What attributes do you like to see in your fictional hero-and-heartthrob? Don't forget, we have three copies of Craig Johnson's ANY OTHER NAME to give away!

70 comments:

Joan Emerson said...

Wow . . . okay, my fictional hero-and-heartthrob has to be a capable, take-charge sort of guy, but sensitive as well. A bit of understanding does my heart good, too, but he needs to be somebody I can respect . . . .

A new Longmire book? That will have to move to the top of my to-be-read pile . . . .

Karen B said...

One of my very favorites is William Kent Krueger's Cork O'Connor.
I haven't read any of the Longmire books (all are on my wishlist) but love the TV series and waiting for the new season to begin.
kpbarnett1941[at]aol.com

Anonymous said...

Longmire is the perfect hero. Strong but vulnerable. An inate sense of right and wrong.

vp said...

Walt Longmire is pretty darned perfect! I have always said that competence is the most underrated quality and I love a competent man. The fact that he adores woman, even though he doesn't always understand them, also makes him super hot. I love a dark hero as much as the next girl, but heroes like Longmire or Russ in Julia's wonderful series, those are the guys I'd want in real life.

Book Momma said...

I really love Walt Longmire. My fictional hero is a strong, silent type-like Lee Child's Jack Reacher or Robert Crais' Joe Pike.

Karen said...

My heroes need to be competent, compassionate, and have a sense of humor. Just finished G.A. McKevett's latest, and the newly married Dirk is such a hoot. The trouble with being a serious reader is that there are so many more that I admire, not to mention the ones I haven't met yet. Write on!

Edith Maxwell said...

I clearly need to put some Longmire on my reading list especially with Crime Bake coming up! I mostly read female protagonists, but I have liked Joe Finder's Nick, and in New England, Ray Daniel's Tucker, who I have read in his award-winning short stories (first novel out in August!). Another new and very compelling male character is Jim Jackson's Seamus McCree - check out his new book, Cabin Fever. All of these guys are men with some real feelings (like men in real life), some reluctance to violence, and without too much swagger about women's skirts.

Karen in Ohio said...

As Deb said, all of the above, plus not only respecting women, but treating them as equals. That, to me, is as sexy as a sense of humor, and while not a rare quality, it's still not the norm quite yet.

But Deb's Duncan, Julia's Russ, Hank's Jake, and Louise Penny's Gamache all have that particular level of respect for their female partners, and it's much more interesting to read about them than about a man who pooh-poohs everything "the woman" says.

I've been married twice, and one of the reasons my second marriage has endured as long as it has is because Steve just takes it for granted that I'm at least as smart as he is. How could I not love that? If I were writing a hero Steve would be my inspiration.

And of course, Buck Schatz. How could you not love that crusty old dude? He's so darned funny.

James Montgomery Jackson said...

Edith, Thanks for your mention of my Seamus McCree novel Cabin Fever.

I want heroes who are slightly larger than real life, but struggle with real life issues. I am not attracted to the loner. I prefer those with family relationships (like Walt Longmire or Lucas Davenport or Cork O'Connor).

~ Jim

Kaye Barley said...

I resisted Craig Johnson's work for the first couple of books because I didn't think they would be my cup of tea. Boy Howdy, was I ever wrong. Walt, along with his friends and family are all people I want to spend a lot of time with. And yes, I have an enormous crush on him (and on Craig Johnson too. And what Hank said - his wife Judy is a very cool woman who has a pair of boots I covet - original Gene Autry cowboy boots. to die for.).

I think you've all about covered all the things that make me swoon - especially the sense of humor thing. A man who can make me laugh knows the way to my heart. I'll add one more fictional boyfriend to the guys you've already mentioned - Mike Chapman in Linda Fairstein's Alex Cooper series.

Rhonda Lane said...

Walt is hot for all those reasons listed above and because he reads. So does Henry Standing Bear, even though he's the one with the reputation as a ladies man in Absaroka. But when Walt's alone tracking a madman on a mountain in a blizzard, he's not just thinking about food and warmth but Dante's INFERNO. Walt's also good with and kind to kids and horses, and he has an awesome Dog (yes, capitalized.)

Michael Kelberer said...

I've enjoyed heroes of many of the kinds mentioned, but I notice that the ones I re-read are:
1. Always able to deliver
2. Are confident they can deliver
3. Have flaws, but spend less time agonizing over them and more time working around them.

Gerald So said...

When I hear the word "hero", I think of unquestionably upright and just characters. I admire them, sure, but I can't relate to them that well.

I prefer characters who have doubts and struggles like mine, who may not be firmly entrenched in the camp of Good. I find these characters, who fall under the looser term "protagonist", more intriguing. When given many plausible choices, a character's choosing "the right thing" is more significant. I think of Han Solo returning for the Death Star battle in the original Star Wars, or of Firefly/Serenity's Malcolm Reynolds.

Tammy said...

Humor has to be there for me, but there's also something about the combination of competence and humility. Or, alternatively, self-awareness. He needs to not spend the whole book swaggering around--or if he does, he needs to do it with a grin and the self-awareness that he's being an ass.

And maybe a dash of charm. It could be geeky charm or suave charm or the light in his eye that says "I love women." But yeah, gotta have some of that too.

Hank Phillippi Ryan said...

Artticus Finch, Atticus FInch. Also a sense of honor, you know?

And how about Foyle?

Libby Dodd said...

I have to go with "All of the above." You have covered it well.

Elise M Stone said...

I'm one of those who discovered Longmire through the television series and wondered why I'd never heard of these books before. I met Craig Johnson at the Tucson Festival of Books two years ago. He is a fabulous speaker and one of the nicest people you'd ever get to meet. He stopped by our fledgling Sisters in Crime booth to introduce himself and when he signed The Cold Dish for me, instead of rushing through a scribbled autograph, he took the time to write something personal.

As far as other heroes, the first one that came to mind was Robert B. Parker's Spenser. I love his wry sense of humor and his can-do attitude. And, annoying as she can be, Susan gives him humanity.

Wish I could be at Crimebake this year, but Boston's a long way from Tucson.

Mary Sutton said...

Oh gosh, you've covered so many of mine: honest, competent, intelligent, a sense of humor (especially about himself), respect for others, likes women and respects them - but also has a vulnerability, maybe that he can see and knows he should get over, but he just can't quite take that step.

Yes, Hank's Jake is good. I like Longmire (although I want to shake him).

But I also like the outwardly "bad boy" who inside has better morals and a better heart than anyone gives him credit for - and he just doesn't care if the only person who can see it is the woman he loves.

Easy on the eyes, never hurts (if I must be totally honest).

Ellen Kozak said...

How wild that there is a conference called Murder and Mayhem in Muskego. I've lived in Wisconsin since I was five months old (with the exception of my college years) and never, to my knowledge, have I set foot (or wheels) in Muskego, and I doubt I know anyone who has.

Not even in my years of political activism that took me all around the state, nor in the many presentations I've given on copyright and publishing law all over the state. Nor do I think I've ever had a client from there in 45 years of law practice. I think I once met someone who lived in Mukwanago, which is-- I think-- near Muskego, but I've never been to either city.

You learn something every day.

Susan Elia MacNeal said...

Welcome, Craig! (Love a man in a cowboy hat...)

Janet Mendelsohn said...

I have crush on Travis McGee in John B MacDonald's great series...but we'd never make it as a couple, given how I feel about Florida. The west, however, has beckoned since childhood and since I discovered Walt Longmire (tv and books) recently, Travis has some competition.

Kim said...

As I work on new fictional protagonists (including one who is male), I cannot tell you how invaluable everyone's opinions and comments are. I feel like printing this out as a guide for me when I'm feeling lost along the writing way.

Patti Phillips said...

I love the Longmire character - after all, I did give a rave review to "Cold Dish." ;-) The tall, rugged type with intelligence, a sense of humor and integrity, mixed with a few flaws, is very appealing.

FChurch said...

When I think of a hero, my first thought is of the movies I grew up with--especially westerns--Randolph Scott, Gary Cooper, and oh and always Gregory Peck. In books, that translated to moral strength--characters might be upright and certain of their place in the universe, or darker and more flawed--but always drawing on some inner strength even when tested--like Anne Perry's Thomas Monk. I especially like those characters who struggle within a particular cultural context--so Joe Leaphorn, for example--or in a time outside of now--like Charles Todd's Ian Rutledge, or Benjamin January--but also adored the early Spencer books, so my hero can be tough, resilient, sassy, have a definite sense of humor, self-deprecating preferred. And, a dog doesn't hurt!!

Carole said...

Yes, all of the above! And I agree with Hank about Foyle in Foyle's war - he stands up to his superiors, following a sometimes unpopular moral compass. And that competence thing. Morse is my man too - a sensitive curmudgeon. And does anybody know the Swedish detective Wallander? We've become addicted to the Swedish TV series on Netflix. Flawed but relentless and successful.
Gamache, Duncan, Russ too.
Seems we all have a lot to say on this topic ...

Rhonda Lane said...

Atticus. Absolutely. It's not just because of Gregory Peck, either.

Deborah Crombie said...

Oh, Hank, Foyle! I love Foyle! And reading everyone's comments--so interesting--I realized that my first real fictional hero was Peter Wimsey. There was such intelligence, and such integrity, beneath the charm. And yet he struggled, not only with what we would now call PTSD, but with the moral responsibility of solving a crime--because hanging was still legal in Britain.

Great photos, Julia!

And if those of you who like curmudgeons haven't read Chris Fowler's Bryant and May books, do! They are wonderful!

Deborah Crombie said...

PS Duncan would never consider himself a hero. He loves his family and his job, and tries to do the right thing. It's when doing the right thing gets complicated that things get really interesting.

Karen in Ohio said...

And that is also part of his charm, Deb, that he doesn't think of himself as special in any way.

Which makes him pretty special, really.

Lexie's Mom said...

Yes, most of the above. Love Walt! Part of it is the hat--who can resist a cowboy?!? He's very real, I think, which works for me. Julia's Russ is similar in that, to me, and I adore him, too. So excited that Craig Johnson is coming to Crime Bake! (Happy dance! Happy dance!). I haven't seen the show, but the books are amazing.

CindyD said...

Love Craig Johnson and have read all his books, and love the front page of the Arizona Republic life section today, which has a gorgeous photo of him!

Mary Sutton said...

Deborah, I think you hit something. My protag (who's name is also Duncan, but it's his last name), wouldn't consider himself a hero either. He's just doing what needs to be done. His personal life is kind of a mess. But I think others in his life would disagree with the "hero" status (or at least I hope so - readers too).

Kathy Reel said...

My fictional hero is confident enough in himself that the woman he is with is on equal footing. He isn't threatened by her individuality and success. However, his confidence doesn't mean swagger-type know-it-all; it's a quiet, capable steadiness. He does the right thing, but he is not a robot about it. He can sometimes struggle with its possible repercussions on those around him, but he ends up on the side of right because that is how he's wired. A sense of humor is essential for his survival in the situations which he encounters. He is honorable and mostly honest, except when he is just being human and deceiving himself. He knows how to love and values his object of love, with passion kept in check until it isn't. Compassion within reality is another attribute. He does what he can, but he realizes that he can't fix everything or everyone. So, with the above qualifications is it any wonder that I have fallen hard for Russ, Duncan, Daniel, and Jake. Also, I have a warm spot in my heart for Jamie Fraser, but then, I pretty much am a sucker for a guy in a kilt.

I hate to say that I haven't had the pleasure of falling for Longmire yet, but I will remedy that situation soon. There is so much affection for him in all the replies that I'd be rather daft not to indulge myself.

Kate L said...

I agree with competence being sexy, especially if/when paired with confidence! And I agree with many of the heroes already mentioned in the comments. So I'll just add Joe Gunther (in the Vermont series by Archer Mayor), and Joe Pickett as written by CJ Box.

One of the appealing aspects of Joe Pickett is that he not only genuinely loves his wife, but that he does his best to support her, and that we as readers see them working as a team.

And now I have to figure out what other heroes I'm overlooking ...

Hank Phillippi Ryan said...

Peter Wimsey! I honestly used to dream about him. And Henry V, too.

Deborah Crombie said...

Hank, twins separated at birth:-) My first trip to London, the first thing I did was visit Lord Peter's fictional address on Picadilly.

And I don't even want to admit how many time I watched Ken Brannagh's Henry V. By myself, in the theater... Scary.

Pat D said...

Wow, everyone is hitting all the right notes here. Humor, usually self deprecating, duty, honor, respect for others, good manners, good friends and family one cares about. Knowing the right thing to do and doing it, and not telling everyone all about it. A nice big smile. All the folks everyone has mentioned plus a few more. Lord John Grey, since Jamie has already been nominated. Max Tudor from G.M. Malliet's books. John Madden from Rennie Airth's books.
Dwight Bryant from Margaret Maron's books. All hard working men, slogging away despite whatever life throws at them. And of course Walt Longmire fills the bill in all ways!

Barbara said...

I think Harper Lee hit it out of the ballpark with Atticus Finch!

Sharon said...

We watched Longmire on TV, but I don't think either of us has read the books - I'll have to correct that!

There are any number of series that I always read and heroes across the spectrum. The only heroes I don't really like are those who are just short of being a superhero. I like the good men in difficult situations, the trustworthy ones, the ones who'd be good people to know.

But I do have a real weakness for the darker sort of hero: Rebus, Joe Pike, Harry Bosch, Tony Hill.

Two I don't think have been mentioned yet are Kate Atkinson's Jackson Brodie and Mo Hayder's Jack Caffery. They're a long way from Peter Wimsey (who was probably my first crush too), but I'm really invested in them and always waiting for the next book in these series to be published.

susan b said...

My boyfriend's favorites are John Rain and Ian Rutledge. I'm still scratching my head over that - they seem so different to me. I still adore Albert Campion.

Ann in Rochester said...

My fictional heroes may be male or female. I like someone with a dry humor, kind, insightful, well read, calm, able to leap tall buildings with a single bound.

In fact, this is also the sort of person I would choose for a friend. I love Gemma and Duncan of course, Gamache, Harry Hole, Poirot, Dave Robicheaux, Miss Marple, Barbara Haver and about a hundred more.

If I sound easy it is because I am!

Terry Ambrose said...

Longmire is pretty darned cool. Who wouldn't want him on their side? Or, conversely, NOT on the other side!!

Dani said...

I'm embarrassed to admit I haven't read one of these! The humor part is what sells the hero for me - well, all the other important stuff PLUS humor.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing your ideal men in fiction.

I loved Rhys Bowen's Evan Evans from the Constable Evans mysteries.

I also loved the character of the husband from the Amanda Cross mysteries. The wife is a lit professor and the husband is an attorney.

Everyone, thank you for sharing new books for me to discover. I cannot believe I never read Longmire.

When I checked the A&E tv schedule, it looks like the second season for Longmire will premiere on Monday, June 2nd.

~hmdt

Susan D said...

Yup, Atticus Finch, Christopher Foyle. They are the top of the heap.

Denise Ann said...

Lynley! Russ! A little rough around the edges is fine. Even a little nuts is good. Harry Bosch.

storytellermary said...

Standing up for what's right . . . respecting others . . . yes, Atticus is the one. A blog post on women harassed on the streets pointed out that it is not helpful when men say "we don't all act that way" and warn women that going out alone is dangerous. Speaking up when other men act badly or speak disparagingly, every time it happens, would be so much more helpful. Courage to stand up . . . can I add Rhett Butler? <3

Hank Phillippi Ryan said...

Campion! Rutledge! Absolutely...xoo

(And di you hear,the Todds are writing a prequel? Whoa.)

LeeAnne Dale said...

My first hero of fiction was Mr. Rochester. I have loved Walt Longmire since the very first book but I think that my biggest literary crush is Ross Poldark. I re-read the entire Winston Graham series every few years. Ross's love for Demelza makes me all swoony. That's a word, right?

Denise said...

Bartholomew Gill's Peter McGarr. He was a great father and husband, as well as detective in the Garda. I was so sad to learn of the author's death.
denannduvall(at)gmail(dot)com

Margie B said...

How about David Rosenfelt's Andy Carpenter--solves cases with a sharp sense of humor. And let's not forget Rosenfelt himself--he saves golden retrievers, and all of his recent Carpenter books feature a gorgeous photo of a dog on the cover.

Shannon Baker said...

Walt's about as good as they come. Smart, wry, driven to do the right thing. Vulnerable. Big heart.

blanetjack@yahoo.com said...

Blanet said ...
I *love* competent. I think it's sexy as heck! But you have to have a sense of humor and some respect for life to become a hero - and Walt and Craig clearly have all that.

Bob said...

I've read and seen interviews with his family and they have all said with Gary Cooper, what you see on the screen is the way he was in person. Gregory Peck, I'm assuming was probably the same way. Craig Johnson has created Walt Longmire in the same mold. Not perfect, but you feel a sense of honor about him. Anachronistic, certainly. Believable, without a doubt.

rsvance said...

I like a man who's strong, capable, loving, competent, and respectful, and above all he must love animals. I want a man who will be there for me no matter what, as I will be there for him. I've had people joke with me saying if there's ever a zombie appocalypse that they want to be with me since I'm the most capable person they know. I laugh and say that's why I married my husband and have stayed married to him for 28 years is because if the appocalypse happens HE'S the one I want to be around. He's strong, capable, loving, competent, and he loves all my many animals as much as I do.

Cynthia Conciatu said...

I love the hero who is pleasing to the eye, respectful of women, enjoys my company and supports my interests and activities as I do his. He is faithful, has a great sense of humor and enjoys conversation or just being close and comfortable. I love the Longmire hero, but he'd probably just write me a speeding ticket and send me on my way as I'm neither outdoorsy nor weatherproof.

jperry said...

I love both Sheriff Longmire - the mystical side of him as well as the strength and the never giving up.

Joan S. said...

My hero -- smart, funny, willing to "get it done", appreciative, and full of integrity. Walt fits it perfectly!

Pam Straus said...

Strong,smart, sense of humor, likes and respects women, loyal, honest, very competent, loves dogs and horses, loves to read.

Dennis Lenzendorf said...

Well I would like a woman hero, she can handle horses, pickup trucks and horse trailers, cowboys and outlaws with equal dexterity. Ex military with a sense of humor. Skill in survival in the mountains and blizzards. She should also look good in blue jeans, cowgirl hat and boots.

beartotomom said...

The "get'er done" attitude - Walt never stops going forward. He may get knocked off balance, but he will never give up. Humor, intelligence & respect for all things, even if he doesn't fully understand them.
P.S. - thanks for some hints on good reads.

Patricia Stoltey said...

linInte manyI like the cynical, strong hero who has a tender side but covers it with his sass. I love Walt. Another that comes to mind is David Freed's Cordell Logan.

Barbara T. said...

Kind, thoughtful, responsible are good qualities for any hero.

Leigh Ann Summers said...

How about Doc Savage (Clark Savage Jr.) by Lester Dent or known as Kenneth Robeson. Doc helped the wek, righted the wrong and help to save nations.

Tom said...

The late Kage Baker managed to bracket the hero-heartthrob category with two recurring characters, protagonists in their own right, in her Company novels.

Joseph is a facilitator - wiley, shrewd, insightful, with a strong streak of confidence man in his heart. He fights it when it doesn't advance his current mission. And he's faithful to women, In His Way.

And then there is Lewis, a Literary Preservationist, and archeologist of the written word. He is pale, blond, genteel, and excellent horseman and, it would seem, much admired by the women who have . . . known . . . him. He is the soul of discretion, willing to risk all for the treasures of civilization, and a gentleman to the last (which could be a very long time coming).

Janet Washer said...

That would be THIRD season - looking forward to June 2. Two of my fave heroes: Ivanova on Babylon 5 (TV) and Cordelia Naismith Vorkosigan (Lois McMaster Bujold Vorkosigan series. There are lots of guy heroes -- I like a couple who are smart(asses) something like Longmire (in the books.)

george k said...

Longmire-great tv series, better books. The books I'm drawn to have a bigger than life hero (man or woman) with enough flaws and quirks to make him interesting. Think Reacher.Their character should be strong enough that you know they can get the job done with out being viewed as some super-hero.

Tony said...

If you could combine Robert Parker's Spenser, Jim Butcher's Dresden and Craig Johnson's Walt Longmire you end up with a character that is extremely smart, funny, strong willed, honest, deep, and most of all, a hero. All three awesome characters who's adventures I like following

Anonymous said...

He must have flaws, or he won't be relatable or believable. I also prefer if he is someone who can be pushed pretty far without losing control, but when he does...ooooohhhhh, boy! I do like heros with a military background, whether distinguished or not. A solid moral compass and sense of justice is a must. Relationships with the opposite sex? He should be confident, but not overbearing, and a generous lover. Come to think of it, Walt is pretty darn close to perfect, by my standards! It doesn't hurt that Craig lives just down the road and my wife and I have had the pleasure of talking with him on many occasions. Walt Longmire's "Daddy" is an enjoyable fellow around whom to be.

Yetta said...

I don't think much about heroes, which might seem odd. Maybe it's because I've not 'met' many in life or literature. But I do like Louise Penny's Gamache.