Monday, October 12, 2020

Adventures in Eating! by Jenn McKinlay

 JENN MCKINLAY: This time last year, I was in Paris, finalizing the research on July's book Paris is Always a Good Idea. Ah, Paris! I don't think it's an understatement to say that trip feels like a lifetime away now. But the book is here and it got a starred review from Publisher's Weekly, just sayin'! So, let's revisit one of my fave parts of the trip - THE FOOD!!!

I spent my time in Paris tracing the steps that my characters took, taking copious notes, and eating my body weight in pastries while trying new and fabulous foods and all sorts of food combinations that I would never have thought of on my own. Things that I discovered that I love: warm brie and fig jam on fresh bread. 


And things that I did not love - rose flavored macarons (but the pistachio was excellent).



Other adventures in eating included every cheese available - a personal favorite being Roquefort paired with red wine in the evening, chocolat chaud (hot chocolate but amazing), pastries until I exploded, escargot (natch, but also curiosity satisfied I'm good), and chocolate, chocolate, chocolate. 

Traveling with teenagers required frequent stops at the Franprix, where we learned that the French prefer to eat their cereal in chocolate milk, because of course they do! The hooligans got behind that - and how - and the dudes practically lived on the city's favorite lunch jambon-beurre (a buttered baguette stuffed with sliced ham). Here are some pics of our food adventures from the trip:

Pastries!


Espresso and Chocolate Chaud!


Pain aux raisin (my personal fave)!


Hooligans loading up on street food: A baguette stuffed with skewers of steak or chicken and a sausage with onions and peppers all together for only six euros. So good!!!


 Okay, Reds, what are some of the weirdest food combinations you’ve ever tried? 

HANK PHILLIPI RYAN: Oooh, brie and fig jam, love that so much! Strawberry jam and cream cheese on a hot toasted sesame bagel. Once I put doritos on a turkey sandwich, and it was great. Plain unflavored yogurt with cinnamon and sugar. Deelish! Total dessert. And --I know it sounds crazy: but applesauce and cottage cheese. Yes. Somehow, it works--it’s a chemistry thing, I guess.It does not taste like either one of those ingredients. (I recently heard tell of margaritas with sugar instead of salt. I mean--gah. Isn’t that sacrilege?) 

JENN: Yes, yes, it is!

 RHYS BOWEN: I was served fig jam with a cheeseboard recently and loved it! I’ve always served Brie with chutney. But I’m not big on too outlandish flavor combinations. I would never eat garlic ice cream as served at the garlic festival! Not bacon ice cream. But yay to salted caramel. The weirdest combination was my daughter, aged 2, who insisted on dipping her iced bun into ketchup when we were in England. And I hate eggs with pancakes. Never. 

 HALLIE EPHRON: When I was a kid, my sister Amy invented a snack: carrot sticks dipped in tomato juice. And my daughter Molly invented what we called “Molly Mix” - cranberry juice, orange juice, and bubbly water. I second salted caramel. Yum. And a margarita with sugar instead of salt is gross. 

DEBORAH CROMBIE: Totally agree on the margarita with sugar. Obscene! But there's a restaurant here that makes a margarita with grilled pineapple and jalapeno, and it is absolutely delicious. Now I want one. Maybe we'll have to get takeout with cocktails. And speaking of jalapenos--and figs--I made fig and jalapeno jam a couple of weeks ago and that was delicious, too. It is the perfect thing with cheese. My mom loved bananas with peanut butter and mayonnaise, so that's probably totally weird. I still like it, but Rick thinks it's absolutely disgusting!

LUCY BURDETTE: My mother ate onion and mayo sandwiches--ugh! But the weirdest food I ever had was in Japan. I was disappointed with myself, but I simply don't like fish that's raw or slimy. It started with eel tempura one of the first nights and went downhill from there. John and I took to calling their adorable little lunch containers "bait boxes."

But those pictures of Paris make me swoon with homesickness. I'm clinging to the hope that I'll be going next fall...

All right, Readers, you're up! What weird food combos have you enjoyed or despised? Or what's a food adventure you'd like to share?

100 comments:

  1. I first sampled brie and fig jam on toast when I was sitting at Deb's kitchen island, chatting after a long day at work. It's delicious! She is far more adventurous about food than I am. I'm still trying to wrap my mental tastebuds around Joan's chicken, apples, fennel, and onions dish from a week ago Sunday. I think it will be good, but I'm not brave enough to try it yet.

    My weird combos tend to be really mundane, like plain M&Ms with Fritos, or raisins and mozzarella cheese. Warren, however, really enjoyed snacking on a mix of cashews, almonds, and black jelly beans. Much better than it sounds.

    The one that really surprised me, though, was sweet potato fries and mayonnaise. I was highly skeptical the first time that combo was suggested, but it's amazing!

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    1. And garlic mayonnaise is even better, Gigi!

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    2. I want to be the person who likes sweet potato fries...sigh.

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    3. Try them with (garlic--Thanks, Karen!) mayo. They should be fried thin and crisp/tender. Not an everyday indulgence for me, but so much tastier than I ever expected them to be, and much more to my taste than regular potato fries. (Unless they come from McDonald's.)

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    4. Popcorn and M&Ms! Popcorn and Gummy bears!

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  2. Fig jam is good with goat cheese, too . . . .

    My sister made bacon chocolate chip cookies . . . I said, “Huh? Really” but they are delicious . . . .

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  3. When I was a kid, I put iceberg lettuce on my peanut butter sandwiches instead of jelly. I still don't like peanut butter and jelly, but give me a nice piece of crunch with my peanut butter and I'm happy. When I was in exchange student in Brazil, we would eat some kind of plain white cheese maybe like a farmer's cheese, with a slice of guayabada which is guava paste. They called it Romeo and Julieta. So good.

    Sorry, Roberta, but I loved all the snacks in Japan. Crunchy dried fish or dried shreds of squid as a drinking snack is so yummy. And street food skewers of teriyaki grilled eel is fabulous, and I don't even want to look at eels when they're alive.

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    1. I forgot to check the spelling. That's goiabada, not whatever autocorrect thought.

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    2. I used to make sandwiches with butter, peanut butter, mozzarella or provolone slices, and mung bean sprouts. Crunchy and so good!

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    3. Edith, as a child I loved peanut butter on lettuce! I thought I was the only one!

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    4. Peanut butter and bacon is amazing! Just sayin’

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    5. I will put bacon on my almond butter toast, so I believe you!

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  4. More than a little embarrassed to admit this, but as a child, I liked cream cheese and peanut butter. Together. And I still do. Occasionally. Is it sticky? Even glue-like? You betcha. But honestly, it tastes good.

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    1. My mom made me peanut butter and cream cheese sandwiches. I loved them.

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    2. Never heard of this but I did put cream cheese on my ginger snap cookies - sooo good!

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    3. Never heard of this, but cream cheese is good with most things, so why not?

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    4. I have to admit..this is tempting...

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  5. I've always been an adventurous eater. It was a rule in my house - you had to try it and if you still didn't like it, that was fine. My oddest favorite was peanut butter and sardines. I can't even think about it now, but I loved it as a child. I'm pretty sure it was all about the crunch. I still can't get tripes past my eyes. I don't know why. Snails, excellent, as long as someone else takes them out of the shell for me - don't ask, but it was embarrassing. If I'm out of lettuce, Fritos, Doritos, or potato chips (ridged preferred) are perfect for crunch on a sandwich.

    Please - NO sugar on the margaritas - ever. That should be a felony offense!

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    1. No thank you helpings - that was my rule for the dudes. Thankfully, they’ve always been adventurous!

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    2. Sardines? I have a husband who eats sardines with cooked tomatoes every morning for breakfast. Good for the arteries he claims. Yuck

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    3. My husband goes through tins of them as well, mostly for snacks. As much as I loved them as a child, I can't get them past my nose now.

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  6. A few weeks ago I found fresh figs at Whole Foods, and scored a precious quart. I also have a (slowly diminishing) wheel of Brie from Costco, so the figs and Brie and crackers were our cocktail hour snack for the nicest weather when we were sitting on the porch together before dinner. My husband would probably choose that as one of his weirdest food combos, but I was in heaven.

    Pain au chocolat in Paris, Jenn. I could never cheat on it with pain au raisins, although that does look delicious. Paris: the world capital of "bad breakfast choices". Viva la France!

    Debs, a Mexican chef here found some pineapple jalapenos and she makes the most amazing cocktails with them. And I have had a Margarita with sugar. Just no. Why?

    This summer I made a batch of spicy sweet onion relish, and I've been enjoying experimenting with it. It's good on everything. It elevates plain hot dogs to gourmet level heights. It's also good with Brie. But what isn't, really?

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    1. Everything is better with Brie! Mercy, I want a croissant right now.

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    2. Karen, I adore Brie and figs. Our Trader Joe's has still got figs, as of yesterday! And I have Brie. Cocktail snack tonight!

      Jenn, I love Pain au chocolat, but if I had to choose between that and pain au raisin, the raisin would win. That is my very favorite pastry from Pret a Manger when I'm in London. Perfect with afternoon tea.

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  7. I don't really have a weird food combo that comes to mind, but I wanted to comment to say three tangential things:

    1. Jenn, I don't recall ever seeing you in such long hair. It looks good -- but quite a change!
    2. Just wanted to take this opportunity to say how wonderful I found PARIS IS ALWAYS A GOOD IDEA. It reads like one of the great romantic comedies -- I'd love to see a movie version!
    3. While a margarita with sugar is, indeed, a sacrilege, a year or so ago we were in a restaurant offering Margaritas made with bourbon instead of tequila. That sounded horrible to me, too. But my husband ordered one, and the rest of us at the table all took a taste.(Oh, for pre-COVID days!) On the next round, we all had the bourbon one! It was surprising how well it worked. A totally different flavor, of course, but really good.

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    1. Thank you. It was my pandemic hair and has been cut since that pic. A movie would be Ah-mazing! Bourbon margarita - my head just exploded :)

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    2. I vote for the movie. Loved the book.

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  8. My only weird food story is that I once hosted a bacon party - I did chocolate-covered bacon (this was years before I saw it on Food Network). A friend brought bacon-wrapped roasted dates. One of us got the idea to dip the dates in the dark chocolate, fondue style, and OMG...so good.

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  9. brie and fig jam. Well, brie and anything. I make baked brie with sauce of cranberries, maple syrup, butter, rosemary, salt and pepper, fresh lime lime juice, garnished with chopped pecans. So good!

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  10. What is weird to one is probably family tradition to another. For example, growing up we would have oven-warmed plain salted potato chips (or crisps, as the Brits call them) with Christmas dinner instead of actual potatoes in some form. The chips were less bulky and terrific for scooping up the bread sauce: yum! What is bread sauce, you ask? Why, a sauce to accompany poultry. Warmed milk, flavoured with onions and thickened with breadcrumbs; add butter, salt, pepper, freshly grated nutmeg and a dash of sweet paprika. Delicious. Or weird.

    Also, food I could *not* get down my throat during my gap year in France: kidneys, fresh oysters, and calves brain. None of it weird; all of it definitely not to my taste!

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    1. Potato chips for Christmas dinner is just wrong, Amanda! And I have trouble getting my head around bread sauce instead of turkey gravy. But I'll try anything once.

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    2. You're not the first to nix the notion of potato chips at the Christmas dinner table, Ann! My mum never made gravy but always served the plain meat juices from a French gravy boat with two pouring spouts: one side was M for maigre (without fat, from the bottom of the boat) and the other side was G for gras (or fat, which poured from the top of the boat).

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    3. Bread sauce sounds delicious! Oven warmed potato chips - it has never occurred to me to warm them. Hmmm.

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    4. That's the spirit, Jenn. The warm chips with the cold or room temp left-over bread sauce was always a favourite later on Christmas Day evening or on Boxing Day...

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    5. My landlady made me calves brains when I was a student in Germany. And sat across the table from me so I had to eat them I still shudder

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  11. Jenn, I agree with Susan that Paris is Always a Good Idea is a classical romantic comedy and I would love to see a film version of it. It would be an excellent rom-com, a lot better than many recent ones! Just saying.

    In keeping with topic of surprising food combinations, I enjoy fruit in savory dishes. A friend introduced me to brown rice with onions, apples, raisins and walnuts with a little soy sauce and it has become a standard here. Jumping off from that, I put fruit and nuts into many salads and also will use jam as a condiment with cheese or a meat, if in the mood. One of my favorite salads to make for company is a chunky salad of oranges, tomatoes and avocados with a bit of my favorite Italian dressing. Yum.

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    1. Thank you, Judy (and Susan)! You’re brightening my Monday exponentially. I like the way you jazz up the rice - that sounds wonderful and your salad fantastic!

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  12. Isn't it odd that things we love separately are not so great together. I read about a peanut butter sandwich that included shredded carrots and sriracha sauce. I tried that and was not impressed; sticking to just peanut butter, although my mother loved bacon on her pb sandwich. Come to think of it she loved bacon on almost anything!

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  13. Sorry Rhys, but I can't even imagine having pancakes without a fried egg in the middle. Or a waffle that isn't topped with an egg. And of course, real maple syrup. I don't think it's weird at all!

    I grew up on odd things like boiled tongue, brains and eggs -- there you have that egg thing again -- and my favorite, a tomato soup sandwich when I'm sick. This is a slice of buttered toast, topped with a scoop of cottage cheese, and Campbell's Tomato Soup poured over all. It's my go to comfort food.

    I love everything that ever had a shell, and raw oysters are like eating the ocean. Even Julie has learned to like them once she got brave enough to try. When in France, having a jambon beurre for lunch is an almost daily treat. And there is nothing that isn't improved with a dollop of fig jam.

    My childhood peanut butter fix included carrots, sliced the long way. Great crunch and not a bad way to get a vegetable down a kid.

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    1. Oy. Tongue. No thank you. My parents loved it, but I never acquired the taste. Ditto for tripe.

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    2. Organ meats were a big thing in my family too, back then. As I became aware of that, I became much fussier and now don't eat those items.

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    3. Living in AZ, I have come to love menudo (soup made with tripe) but I haven’t eaten it any other way. I also love octopus soup but can’t imagine eating it not in a soup.

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    4. I grew up with brains and calves liver and sweetbread. Brains, just no. And I would have said I'd forever sworn off liver until a friend ordered it at a French cafe in London a couple of years ago, and it was amazing. Not brave enough to cook it myself, however. The sweetbreads I absolutely love, but don't cook because hubby wouldn't touch them. So I'm always hoping to see them on a nice restaurant menu.

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    5. I adore oysters, Ann. And octopus when cooked well. Also sweetbreads in a French restaurant but I’ve never cooked them myself. Too fiddly. Tongue? Not a fan. It’s the texture. In England during the post war years we ate all those things

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  14. Pain au raisins! My favorite, too!
    LUCY: What kind of onion was in your mother' sandwich? It could make a big difference.
    And I agree, I like my peanut butter straight up. Plain. On a finger.

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  15. Celia, I just went back to yesterday's blog to see if the videos were up and saw your response and the story about the soup stock. I am still laughing so hard! I will consider a sock (will tennis do?) next time I make stock, LOL;-)

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    1. Oh great, well so long as you wear that sock for several games and then hike through mud and long wet grass, it will probably be just fine in the stock.

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    2. LOL!!!! I live with three men - plenty of socks to go around!

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  16. Jenn your photos made me want to be there with you, Paris is always a Good Idea is on my Christmas List. Yes, I do like to make myself suffer and wait! But strange foods I have eaten. I love adding Marmite (hated universally here), to peanut butter, so delicious the salty and nutty flavors together. I remember feeling very advanced at the age of around 6, in Trinidad when I invented a snack of Jacobs Cream Crackers (very dry), with cream cheese and sliced banana.
    But my biggest food faux pas was being taken to dinner by Victor's boss before we were married. Victor had left for IBM in the USA. I also worked at IBM, but in the UK. The Boss turned up at my desk with a gift from Victor and an invitation to dinner that night. I was nervous especially when asked to make the reservation. I booked a French Restaurant, Kettners (https://london.eater.com/2018/2/6/16973340/soho-house-group-kettners-townhouse-restaurant-history) as it was a fav of my parents. We arrive to a long French menu, he asks me to choose, I am nervous. "Ris de veau please", I request politely, thinking, rice with veal is safe. Imagine my horror when the plate of sweetbreads appears before me. I don't know if my face gave me away, but years later after Victor and I were married and both in the same country, the Boss, Gil, reminded me and said he realized I didn't know what I had ordered. However, they were delicious and I still search for them on restaurant menus. Not sure I want to prep and cook them myself. I do love all sorts of awful offal, though no tripe, thank you!

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    1. Oh, Celia, that’s hilarious!!! An adventure in eating, indeed!

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    2. Celia, that's hilarious! You will see from above that I'm glad you learned to love them!

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  17. Oh Celia: Ris de veau. Such memories of not knowing what was coming to the table for me. They tasted good until I was told what it actually was. Then my mind took over from mouth and I couldn't swallow another mouthful.

    But count me in on the Marmite fan club. But with peanut butter? I might have to try that today, with my coffee.

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    1. Marmite fan club here. When I was a child I’d love Marmite sandwiches with sliced gherkins

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    2. I can't remember if I've ever had Marmite. Now, of course, I must try it!

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    3. Wow, a JRW Marmite fan club. Never tried them with Perkins Rhys but I'm game
      Amanda, Im not too sure about M+PB +Coffee. I use it as a pick me up or when I'm trying not to eat marmalade.
      Jenn - I think you would remember if you had been given Marmite or Bovril on toast. It's an English thing, and you can ask Julia what she thinks of it. But my daughter went to school here with Marmite sandwiches not PB&J, much to the horror of my friends who didn't understand and she still loves it.

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  18. At a lovely cocktail party in Savannah, GA, we were served open faced Vidallia onion sandwiches (on white bread with homemade mayonnaise) and my New York City born brother in love fell in love with them. But you must use Vidalia onions.
    We were given tongue and liver as children. My mother was a good cook and it was cheap then.
    The worst thing I ever saw was an English eating a crisp butty, that is potato chips as the filling for a buttered bread sandwich.
    In Berlin we had a cheese plate with a little pot of fig mustard. It was delicious! Perfect with cheese.

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    1. Fig mustard sounds fabulous.

      One of my favorite things that sounds weird but isn't, but that I cannot replicate now, is vanilla ice cream with blackberry balsamic vinegar over it. It was spectacular, and I carefully hoarded the vinegar until the last drops. I've never found another source for it.

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    2. Oh, I love vidalia onions, mostly from the deep fried bloomin' onions you get as bar food. Yum!

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  19. Hallie's comment about the onion sandwich reminded me of my German dad, whose favorite sandwich was limberger cheese on rye bread with yellow mustard and a thick slab of Bermuda onion. Washed down with a cold beer.

    The whole house stunk from it (and so did my dad, ew). Fast forward fifty years, and come to find out they serve this very thing at Oktoberfest Zinzinnati. A friend of ours, also German, tries to have one every year because it was also HIS dad's favorite.

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    1. That sandwich sounds delicious to me, but I love the smelly cheeses and onions.

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    2. Jenn, limberger is more than just a smelly cheese. It also tastes like old sweat socks. I don't get the appeal.

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  20. I'm sorry I missed adding to the conversation - I was at my Dad's house with NO INTERNET (so basically living in the 13th century) and my sister, who had the hotspot, left Saturday morning. And it was all clean, clean, clean and drive drive drive yesterday.

    But to the point: I have a fave weird food combo. Toast or crackers spread with peanut butter and dill pickle slices. (I always get the all-natural peanut butter; the other stuff is more like peanut flavored margarine.) Whenever I eat this, even today, someone asks me if I'm pregnant. (Answer: No.)

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    1. Congratulations on getting your father's house cleaned out and returning to civilization within the allotted week! Well done!

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    2. Yes, Julia, yay!! We are so glad you're back!

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    3. Julia, we are so glad you are back!

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    4. I've heard of the dill pickle and p-butter sandwich. Add a slice of bacon and I'm in! Also, glad you are back from the 13th century!

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  21. My Swedish grandfather liked lutefisk. My dad didn’t so we were bever subjected to that. And that winning streak continues! My favorite combo as a kid was a peanut butter sandwich with fritos stuck in it. Nice and crunchy. Any sandwich that was buttered first and then spread with mayo made me gag. Didn’t matter what else went in it. I still like combining tortilla chips or potato chips with slices of cheddar to snack on.

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    1. Pst, I remember something called ? Ligonberries from Sweden?

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    2. My best pal is Swedish - she loves herring, lutefisk, and ligonberries! I like the berries and the herring. Haven't tried the lutefisk yet.

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  22. I grew up eating peanut butter and sweet pickle relish sandwiches. Cottage cheese with a drizzle of molasses and a variety of canned fruits, in heavy syrup, was a regular lunch for granddad. I still like cottage cheese with molasses and sometimes I add some raisins. Plain potato chips in tuna sandwiches is a must and yes to iceberg lettuce and peanut butter sandwiches. I have a recipe for cranberry,green chili sauce that is good on baguettes with cream cheese. I'm off to work in a minute but I saw a mention of blackberry balsamic vinegar with ice cream, but can't find the vinegar now. I have a fig and balsamic vinegar, wonder if it might be close.

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    1. Ooh, Deana, if you try it, let me know how it tastes.

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    2. Balsamic vinegar and ice cream? Okay, that's new.

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  23. Wonderful post! Jenn's food stories about Paris reminded me of my 2 week tour of 5 countries, including France.

    When we spent 2 and half days in Paris, I remember seeing lots and lots of goat cheese, my favorite cheese! I love Brie but brie does not like me. I remember we were at a restaurant in Paris for dinner. Salad with goat cheese. Salmon. I forgot the dessert? I remember drinking ? Kir Royale ? That was the first time I tasted that drink. It was my favorite ? wine ? from that trip. Most of the wines I tasted were "sour" to me.

    When we visited Italy, I remember that there was a place that served flatbread with pizza toppings. In Venice, I was surprised that they had a McDonald's. I had No interest in eating American food over there. LOL. There was a little pizza place and we shared a big pizza. In Florence, I had gelato.

    In Austria, I had the best potato leek soup, ever!

    In Switzerland, I had rosti, which is similar to the American hash browns. Yum! The rosti was the whole meal. It was a big dish, the size of a wok. That was for lunch.

    When I lived in England donkey years ago, I remember street food included baked potatoes. In the USA at that time we had hot dog stands. And pretzels. In England, the baked potatoes had all kinds of toppings! You could choose anything from pineapple chunks to sour cream.

    At Boots, they had sandwiches like tuna fish and dill. Yum!

    When I was in Hamburg, Germany on a separate trip, I had a big sandwich with cucumbers and ? butter? from the deli. I just pointed at the sandwich in the window and they gave me the sandwich I wanted.

    Jenn, the next time I visit Paris, I want to try that street food - Sausage with onions for 6 euros!

    Diana

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    1. There's a Five Guys Burger shop on the Champs Elysees. Hooligan 2 had to try it just to see if they served mayonnaise with the French Fries. They did offer it. We stuck to ketchup.

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    2. Thanks! I could not remember if it was mustard or mayo with the french fries in France. And yes, I will try the Five Guys Burger in Paris the next time I'm there.

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  24. p.s. none of the food above was Weird to me. Just different from what I usually see in the USA.

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  25. When I was young, my mother worked in a BBQ restaurant where they served lots of chickens . My mother retrieved gizzards and hearts and made ragout with these for us. I know no one else who ate that. It was delicious but I never made it for myself and we never had it after my mother changed job.
    I don't think that I currently eat weird things.
    I don't particularly like French macarons ( any flavour) but I love pain aux raisins.

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    1. Pain aux raisins is the best pastry ever! I love gizzards so I'm sure I'd love this dish by your mom.

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  26. When we were kids my sister used to put Fritos in her sandwiches. It was considered odd, but they add a great crunch.
    My father loved to make (for himself, no one else wanted them) brains, tripe, and such. I'm pretty adventurous, but couldn't face these.

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    1. I haven't tried brains. Have to work myself up to it, I think.

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  27. I drink Molly Mix all of the time! And warm Brie with pepper jelly is delish.

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  28. Jenn, the warm brie and fig jam sounds and looks delicious. I can't say I've had a lot of weird or different food items, but the best surprise I had was blackberry ketchup on meatloaf. Last year, my husband and I took a trip through the beautiful fall colors to Berea, Kentucky for our anniversary and stayed at the Boone Tavern Inn (somewhere I had eaten with my parents probably over 50 years ago). It was a lovely drive indeed, and that evening we ate in the hotel restaurant for our anniversary dinner. I ordered the meatloaf because the waitress said it was the best ever. She was right. It used blackberry ketchup in the outside sauce, and my mouth thought it had gone to heaven. I'd never heard of it before. The only other oddity was having a fried egg on my club sandwich in Honolulu. They put fried eggs on everything, and I love it.

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    1. I love fried egg on everything. Blackberry ketchup sounds amazing!

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  29. Oh, I guess I could add that I grew up eating blackberry jelly on my P&J sandwiches. I much prefer it to grape jelly. It's interesting that I can't buy it here in western Kentucky at our local Kroger stores, but I can where I grew up, in Maysville, KY (northeastern KY) at their Kroger store. I stock up on it when I'm there, and luckily I had stocked up on it before the Pandemic, so I haven't run out yet.

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  30. Fried dill pickle chips! Yum!

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    1. I love those so much!!! Dipped in ranch dressing. Yum.

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  31. Fried dill pickle chips. SO GOOD! Fried anything, really.

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  32. The brie, fig jam, and bread would be heavenly. I have a friend that has served that before. She has also been to Paris for work and with her daughter. My favorite weird child combination was peanut butter and Karo syrup. I loved it.

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  33. Brie & fig jam - especially if they're both from France. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack time, and every other hour of the day, it's great combination. Weirdest combo I've tried and liked: Vanilla ice cream with pretzels.

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