Thursday, January 6, 2022

Care for a Biscuit? by Marty Wingate

 Jenn McKinlay: Anyone who knows me knows my answer to the title question. YES, PLEASE! I love a good British biscuit, but here is the fabulous Marty Wingate to tell us more as we celebrate the release of her latest First Edition Library Mystery -- The Librarian Always Rings Twice.

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Marty Wingate: The topic is biscuits. Not American biscuits—those savory scone-like delights—but British biscuits, which are cookies in the States. My books are set in Britain, and so biscuits are ubiquitous, and without realizing I was doing so, I’ve developed a sort of code of biscuits in my mysteries. This made perfect sense to me especially as I learned that a recent poll found that Brits eat an average of 11 biscuits a week. That was before the pandemic. During the past two years, biscuits sales have soared—as well they should. 

 

My biscuit code does not tell the reader who the murderer is by the way he or she dunks his or her digestive. Instead, it is a way of telegraphing just how Hayley Burke—protagonist in my First Edition Library series, including the most recent: The Librarian Always Rings Twice—interacts with those around her. It’s by the choosing, the giving or withholding, and the willingness to partake with others that we see how Hayley deals with the events and people around her.

 

I’m sure we can all agree that biscuits in general are a necessity of life, but which biscuit? In another British poll, this one taken in 2020, the top twenty biscuits were revealed, and coming in at number 1 (no surprise here) is the chocolate digestive with the plain (non-chocolate) digestive at number 11. A biscuit named “digestive” can sound odd to an American. It did to me when I first encountered it eons ago while visiting family friends who lived near Epping Forest. “What is this yummy cheesecake crust made from?” I asked. It was similar to the graham cracker, but much better. Digestives, I was told. I filed the word away and carried out my own research at a later date.




 

Coming in at number 13 in the survey is the rich tea biscuit. Rich tea and Marie biscuits are all one to me—they both have about as much taste as a piece of thin cardboard. I know there will be howls of complaints at my assessment, but there you are. I have passed on my prejudice to Hayley.

 

When faced with the most unpleasant of circumstances, she chooses to take a stand with biscuits. In The Librarian Always Rings Twice, Charles Henry Dill, nephew of the late Lady Georgiana Fowling whose library Hayley curates, is forced upon her as an assistant, and she manages him and her frustration with biscuits. Charles Henry is a lout of the first order, and so when she offers tea—there’s always tea—she accompanies it with a plate of Maries. Charles Henry asks for custard creams, but is told there are none. Hayley then retreats to her office with her own tea and the coveted custard creams. Later, with another character, she accepts the offered jammie dodgers. This biscuit, a children’s favorite, has a shortbread-like base with a spot of red jam. What can we detect from Hayley’s behavior? I’ll let the reader decide.




 

Amid the stalwarts of the top twenty—hobnobs, ginger nuts, bourbons, and custard creams (coming in a number 6), there are a few dodgy entries: Jaffa cakes (cake-ish with a blob of orange not-quite-marmalade in the middle and half-covered with chocolate) are at number 4. Even after a 1991 VAT (tax) tribunal established a Jaffa cake as cake, not biscuit—this is how serious the subject is—it’s still thrown into the biscuit ring. Also, many people voted for the “Maryland cookie,” which apparently is Burton’s (a British baker) version of … American cookies. What? Also, why are Oreos even allowed on this list, which should be limited to the best (aka British) biscuits?


 

I was happy to see malted milk biscuits make the list at number 17. They are quite plain, but one of my favorites, and, unlike Maries, have actual flavor. But the last shout-out must be for shortbread at number 2. Shortbread in any shape is delicious and should always be on hand. Hayley doesn’t go in for the fancier fan-shaped wedges, but sticks with the shortbread fingers—sturdy and buttery with a good snap. You’ll always find a packet of shortbread fingers in the kitchen at the First Edition Library. And in Hayley’s desk. And probably in her flat, too.  

 

Brits Top Twenty Biscuits

 

1. Chocolate digestive

2. Shortbread

3. Chocolate finger

4. Jaffa Cake

5. Chocolate hobnob

6. Custard cream

7. Jammie dodger

8. Maryland cookie

9. Bourbon

10. Crunch cream

11. Plain digestive

12. Viennese whirl

13. Rich tea

14. Ginger nut

15. Hobnob

16. Oreo

17. Malted Milk

18. Nice 

19. Figroll

20. Garibaldi

 

So, what about you, Reds and Readers, what are your favorite British biscuits? 


When a mysterious stranger turns up making claims that threaten Lady Fowling’s legacy, Hayley Burke must dig deep into her late-benefactor’s history to uncover the truth and catch a conniving killer in this new mystery from USA Today bestselling author Marty Wingate.

It has been nearly a year since I took up my position as curator of Lady Georgiana Fowling’s collection of Golden Age of Mystery writers’ first editions at her library in Middlebank House. I have learned that I need to take the good with the bad. The good: I have finally convinced Mrs. Woolgar to open up the collection to the public one day a week so that they too can share in Lady Fowling’s passion. The bad: although he would not be my first, or even tenth, choice, at the insistence of the board Charles Henry Dill, Lady Fowling’s unscrupulous nephew, is now my personal assistant.

On one of our first days open to the public, Mr. John Aubrey shows up at Middlebank House and insists that Lady Georgiana Fowling is his grandmother. Mrs. Woolgar is scandalized by his claims, and Charles Henry, who feels he has been cheated out of his rightful inheritance as Lady Fowling’s heir, is furious. I do not know that I believe Mr. Aubrey, yet he has knowledge of Lady Fowling’s life and writings that few possess. To further complicate matters, an associate of Mr. Aubrey’s intends to help us uncover the truth of John’s story. But before he can do that, he is murdered and the police have reason to suspect Charles Henry.

As much as I would like to lock up Charles Henry and throw away the key, I cannot believe he is a killer. And I also know there is something dead wrong about Mr. Aubrey’s tales regarding his “grandmother” Lady Fowling. I will need to make sense of her past in order to suss out the true villain of this story.

 

 

99 comments:

  1. Congratulations, Marty, on your newest First Edition Library Mystery . . . I’m sure Hayley will find a way to prove the grandmother story is just a story, but the fun is in seeing just how she does it. I’m looking forward to reading Hayley’s newest adventure.

    As for the biscuits, I was going to say Biscoff Lotus Cookies, but I think they’re actually from Belgium. So I’ll have to stick with Hayley’s favorite, Walkers Shortbread because [as far as I know] that’s the only British cookie I’ve ever actually eaten. [Those dark chocolate ones are really tempting, though . . . .]

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    1. Biscoff! I was introduced to them on a flight to the UK and now see they've arrived here in the US, too. I love them!

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  2. Congratulations Marty on your book release.

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  3. MARTY: Congratulations on your new book!

    As for biscuits, I have to agree with their first two choices: milk digestives and classic shortbread. But I also like Jaffa cakes, and am shocked there was a debate on whether it was a biscuit vs cake! And I agree with you that Oreos should NOT be on the list of top British biscuits.

    And since I am from Canada, I have to give a shout-out to the Peek Freans line of cookies. They originated in the UK (I think). Not sure if they are sold in American grocery stores but you can buy them on Amazon. I grew up eating their assorted cookies which included vanilla and chocolate biscuits filled with creme, as well as their fruit creme biscuits:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LM8ZVHQ
    https://www.amazon.com/Peek-Freans-Assorted-Cookies-300g/dp/B00BPXQ7U8

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    1. Grace, I remember my mom buying Peek Freans when we were kids. I don’t remember the last time I saw them in the stores. We liked them!

      DebRo .

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    2. DEBRO: Peek Freans are still found in Canadian grocery stores but I have not eaten them since I was a kid. They have expanded their offerings with more "healthier" cookies (e.g. Bran crunch) but I don't buy them now.

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    3. Peek Freans are definitely sold in the US and are quite good! I'm with you, Grace, on the milk digestives and shortbread. Yum!

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  4. I am so hungry now!

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  5. Congratulations on the new book, Marty, and brilliant to control characters with the biscuit code!

    I don't know many British biscuits types by name, so I'll stick with shortbread - always a fave. There's another kind of biscuit that is mostly whole meal, but sweet. I think I had them in England, but the last trip was thirty years ago. You sometimes find them in American cracker assortments except they aren't a bit savory.

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    1. Edith I think the biscuit you mentioned is by made by Carr’s. I’ve only seen them packed in a cheese biscuit size over here where they are called wheatmeal and the box is dark red.

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    2. Yes, that rings a bell. Thanks, Celia!

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    3. I have bought something like that to serve on a cheese board. Very yummy indeed. They are sweeter than most American style crackers.

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    4. Thanks, Edith! Your description sound very much like a digestive. Digestives are the most-often dunked biscuit, even though they have a tendency to break off and plop back in the tea.

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  6. Aaarrrgggg, mass produced packaged cookies. Okay, call them biscuits if you want. I get it; I majored in British Civilization (Truth.) But I don't eat them, not even Oreos. My grandmother baked her own, and when a box arrived at my dorm, there'd be a line of my friends outside my door. If I need a cookie/biscuit (and sometimes one does), I bake my own as well.

    But congrats on the book, Marty. One of my sisters is a librarian; I think all librarians are heroines.

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    1. Homemade is the best, of course! I make my own shortbread.

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  7. Congratulations on your new release!

    Walker's shortbread (which Trader Joe's carries) and McVitie's chocolate digestives, available through Amazon and at Kroger. Who knew?

    I have to add the most amazing cookie from Australia: Tim Tams. I just discovered Walmart carries them. Trader Joe's attempted a copycat without success.

    Back to my regularly scheduled sprint.

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    1. Thanks, Margaret! Tim Tams sound intriguing - I must go on a hunt!

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  8. Congratulations on the release! I don't think I've ever had British biscuits but I'd be willing to give any of the Top 20 a try.

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    1. Thanks, Liz! Depending on where you live, you might find a British biscuit in the international aisle of your local market. (And, as pointed out, Walkers shortbread is at Trader Joe's!

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  9. Now you’re speaking my language Marty and Big Congrats and success on your new book. I love biscuits; for elevenses, tea, part of dessert. I baked shortbread through the first year of the pandemic. Thanks for the top 20. Other than shortbread my bestie is dark chocolate digestives followed by Bourbons. Amazon is good for English biscuits but shipping biscuits does cause some damage.

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    1. Thanks, Celia! I love bourbons! We order McVitie's digestives from World Market and even though they appear to have been protected during shipping, we still get crumbles. Oh well.

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  10. Marty, I love this post! Your Hayley is so similar to my Hayley--food has a lot of meaning for each of them. Can't wait to try this series.

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    1. Thanks! Itt grounds our characters, doesn't it?

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  11. This so took me back to my first 6 month stay in Britain at age 15. I loved many types of biscuits, but the bourbon biscuit was my favorite. My parents were both librarians; yay for books about librarians!

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    1. Does it actually have bourbon in it?

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    2. I don't think so, it's chocolate and not too sweet.. delicious! The name comes from the European royal house of Bourbon.

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    3. Thanks, Gillian! As far as sandwich-style biscuits go, custard creams are probably my favorite, but I do love bourbons!

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    4. Edith - I don't know why they are called bourbons!

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  12. Congratulations on The Librarian Always Rings Twice, Marty ! I like stories taking place in or around libraries. I’ll check this series as I like to begin with the fist book.

    My choice of biscuits has to be Walkers shortbreads if only for welcoming memories.
    When I began to visit UK, even in the cheapest B&B or little hotel, I would find something to make tea and little packets of those shortbreads. Very comforting after hours travelling or visiting.

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    1. Thanks, Danielle. You've hit on one of my favorite reasons to visit the UK - the tea tray in your hotel/B&B room! It's so nice to be able to make a cup of tea without using the coffee maker. And the biscuits are a lovely treat.

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    2. Marty, here. I keep showing up as "unknown."

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  13. Marty, welcome to JRW and congratulations on the release of The Librarian Always Rings Twice. It sounds terrific. This new-to-me series sounds right up my alley. I think the biscuit code is hilarious. We probably all do things like that. It would be hard to share the goodies with someone like Charles.

    We had the privilege of taking a fabulous wildlife viewing/hiking vacation in Scotland the summer before the pandemic. Every day, besides all the fabulous meals and desserts, they left individually wrapped Walkers Shortbread biscuits in our room. (Reds, each one is probably 500 calories.) I hoarded them and was still munching on them long after we arrived home. Although I generally agree with Ellen, most baked goods in my home are homemade, these cookies are beyond the pale.

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    1. Thanks, Judy! I love Scotland (Edinburgh is my favorite city in the world.) On your next trip there, try an empire biscuit, which is a favorite there. I have no idea why they're called empire biscuits!

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  14. I'm going to check out your series, Marty. It's new to me.

    Digestives with dark chocolate and Hobnobs are always on hand in this house, and I would never say no to a Jaffa Cake. I haven't had a Bourbon in years, but they are yummy.

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  15. Congratulations on the new book! I was not familiar with your series, and have just reserved a copy of the first one at my local library. Needless to say, it sounds like exactly my taste!

    I have not been to England yet. (Had a big trip planned for early summer of 2020 -- no need to say that didn't happen!) While I am a voracious reader of British mysteries, your post has enlightened me in several ways about the ubiquitous biscuits. Armed with your list, I might just try seeking out a few of these to try them.

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    1. Thanks, Susan! Delayed travel - grrrr. We are returning to England in March (our first visit in two years). I'm so looking forward to it!

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  16. Sometimes it's hard to believe the United States shares the same language with the UK. Cookies are biscuits, biscuits are scones, and chips are crisps. Bourbon biscuits aren't bourbon, they're chocolate. Got it. I think.
    A woman seated next to me on the Chunnel from London to Paris had a packet of chocolate digestives and she shared with me. Sheer heaven.

    If you've watched Ted Lasso you know about the biscuits Ted uses to win over his boss Rebecca. My daughter and her family are huge fans, and the biscuits I made at Christmas were a surprise hit. There's a recipe online. They're shortbread bars, and very good

    Here in the Cincinnati area we have a huge food emporium with two locations that strives to carry as many international brands and foodstuffs as possible. Jungle Jim's, in addition to departments of Asian, Italian, French, and Middle Eastern, and many other cuisines, has a large British section. (They also have a hot sauce department as big as some Trader Joe's stores). Tons of different treats like biscuits, but also every kind of tea and marmalade and other spreads as you can think of. In this area that's where you go for Ovaltine, or PG Tips, or Marmite. Also, oyster sauce, or fresh octopus, or that unusual cheese you've been looking for. Their gluten free section is massive, for instance. If it's edible, they have it, or can get it for you.

    And now I want a job as Hayley's assistant. I'd bring her some biscuits, but the good stuff.

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    1. Marmite for the win: Yes!

      Karen: I want you to know that I am trying out that Bollywood fitness/dance video you posted the other day. Thank you very much for it. It's loads of fun.

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    2. Isn't it fun? So glad you're enjoying it, Amanda.

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    3. Marmalade! I could probably order Tiptree online, but instead I get a big can of Mamade and make my own. All the oranges are prepared and you cook it up with sugar, a bit of water and a knob of butter. Heavenly.

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  17. The favorite biscuit at my house is a plain digestive but I have to admit that we use it in place of a cracker (the edible one, not an after Christmas dinner pull one) which is surely an abomination to the British!

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    1. Plain digestives with cheese are very acceptable, Emily!

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    2. If they can be used as cheesecake crust, they can be used any way you like!

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  18. Marty, time for me to check out your series--I just saw your newest on fantastic fiction last night.

    As for biscuits, the only one I'm familiar with is shortbread, which I love. But around here, home-made is the answer to a cookie/biscuit need. Last time I peeked, the tin of oatmeal/cranberry/walnut biscuits was down to two and my grand-nephew was giving me the stink-eye. Guess I'll be baking soon. :-)

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  19. Congratulations on your book release. I'm devoting a good bit of my 2022 reading to cozies set in Britain. They were the first I read, and I'm happy to get back to them. The Librarian Always Rings Twice is on my TBR, and I'm eager to learn the code of the biscuit!

    I grew to love biscuits at an early age growing up in a town where half the teachers seemed to be British born. They always shared their biscuits sent in care packages from home. This was the 1950s so they were doubly precious. Chocolate digestives were a favorite. Shortbread over the moon good. When I changed schools the teachers were nuns and no more biscuits. I developed a taste for Social Tea - the closest I could get on the American market. Now with the Internet---I can indulge to my heart's content.

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    1. It's pretty amazing what we can find online. I buy my Yorkshire Gold tea from World Market and it's quite reasonably priced.

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  20. I love shortbread and used to bake them for my mother. I just bought McVities' Digestives at my Publix supermarket the other day. They carry the chocolate ones too. It's in the Foreign foods aisle!

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    1. Chocolate digestives are fab! You can feel quite international hanging out in the foreign food aisle.

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  21. Congratulations on the new book, Marty -
    As for me, Garibaldi biscuits all the way. Raisin sandwich cookies, more savory than sweet. I've loved them since I was a kid. Used to be there were 2 US brands of what we called 'raisin cookies' (and the Brits: fly pies? Ick) - I bought the as regularly as I'd pick up a carton of milk. Now the only way to get the is to order Garibaldi biscuits on the Internet. My last was an order of 12 boxes.

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    1. Hallie: How do you feel about Eccles cakes? I know they're currants not raisins, but I love them. As for 'fly biscuits', yup, I remember them from tea time at my Aunt Vivian's house!

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    2. Hallie, I only discovered last year that they were called Garibaldis! I remembered them from childhood; one of the brands was Sunshine and they were called golden fruit bars. Recently I came across the Garibaldis while wandering around in a World Market store. I loved them, but they were always a little drier than I wanted (I wanted more raisin/less pastry).

      Amanda: I love Eccles cakes! At least the ones I used to be able to buy in the stinky cheese shop in Welleslely, MA. I've never seen them anyplace else--occasionally I think I'll try to make some, but I haven't done it yet.

      Other than that, shortbread is a wonderful cookie/biscuit and would be my top choice. But I'm totally unfamiliar with the others.

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    3. Hallie, are those like Fig Newtons? I love them!

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    4. Edith - Not like fig newtons... not at all.

      Liz YES golden fruit bars! And I'm with you feeling like they're too dry and not enough filling. I want my golden fruit bars back. Start a petition...?

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    5. I ordered Eccles cakes from the English Tea Store, which I had never had in the UK. I love raisins but was not crazy about these.

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    6. Thanks, Hallie! Fly picks-bleach. Do you like eccles cakes as well? More raisin goo in the middle!

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    7. Deborah - I'm not wild about Eccles either, although I see them in bakeries in England. Too much.

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  22. I don't think there has been any British biscuits in my world. I obviously have been denied a great learning opportunity. After reading this list, I think I would like the shortbread if I could dunk them in my tea. I just finished your latest in the Potting Shed Mystery series: Bittersweet Herbs. Enjoyed reading about Pru, Christopher and the rest of the people around Greenoak. Congratulations on the new book in the First Edition Library series.

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    1. Thanks, Deana. You'll notice in the Potting Shed mysteries, Pru is no stranger to tea and biscuits/cake!

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  23. Marty, even though I haven’t read the book yet, I already don’t like Charles!

    I recently discovered Jacob’s Digestives. Even though there’s no chocolate in them( ! ), they’re addictive! I’ve also been buying Jacob’s Cream Crackers, which remind me a lot of Uneeda Biscuits, which I miss. I saw McVities, which I may try next.

    DebRo

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    1. Charles is annoying and fun to write! I love Jacob's Cream Crackers!

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  24. I love hobnobs, but I haven't had any for years. Twenty years ago, I went on a tour of Britain with my mother, sister and an aunt, all Britophiles. My aunt insisted on tea at 4 with biscuits.

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  25. Wow, Marty, I guess I have been missing out, in more ways than one! I'll have to remedy that right away. Sadly, I am only familiar with biscuits in books, but reading your descriptions, as well as others' here, I will have to make an effort to find and try some.

    Tell me, do they also have cookies in the UK? I'm thinking chocolate chip, or oatmeal or sugar cookies. Certainly, the cooks must whip up a batch of something like those, am I right?

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    1. They do have a few, such as chocolate chip), and I usually see referred to as American cookies.I think for sugar cookies you'd get shortbread, but I'm not certain. There are loads of tasty oaty things, Hobnobs among the best!

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  26. Oh, so great! LOVE this. I adore Carr's Wheatmeal Wafers. Oh, they are fabulous--just a little graham crackery, but not really, and great with cheese. Or not. Oh. I am ordering some right now. Thank you!
    There's also a cooke/biscuit called...oh, I can't remember. They're called: breakfast treats? (But maybe they're Italian. Anyone, anyone? Di-something?)
    This new book looks wonderful! And thank you for the reminder. Off to click!

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    1. Biscotti, Hank? So yummy dunked in espresso!

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    2. It's almost instant gratification to order online!

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  27. I now have a hankering for shortbread that is all consuming. Delightful post, Marty! Thanks for visiting today and congrats on your release! Very excited to read The Librarian Always Rings Twice!

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    1. Thanks so much, Jenn, for giving me the opportunity to talk about one of my favorite things!

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  28. Penguin Bars. Whenever I'm in Britain (which hasn't been lately) I snap them up.

    Sadly, last time I tried to buy them in Canada at my local Brit Stuff shop, they said, sorry, we can't import them any more. Canadian food import rules say, (wait for it...) there's too much calcium in them.
    Say what?

    This morning I picked up a box of my fave Nairns Oatcakes, which I love with cheese, etc. Though, talking of language shifts, I see the package now calls them "Oat Crackers." Sheesh!

    By the way, Marty, I love the mid-century modern decor on your cover. Congrats.

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    1. Ooh, I love Nairns oatcakes! Always one of the first things I buy when I'm in the UK!

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    2. Too much calcium? Good grief. I found Penguins at World Market (order online!). I love oatcakes!

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  29. Hobnobs and plain digestives. Shortbread makes my list if homemade, preferably with browned butter, but not the packaged kind.

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    1. Yum. I have a recipe for brown sugar shortbread - quite good!

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  30. When I did my junior year abroad in London, my diet consisted almost entirely of hard bread rolls, wonderful cheese, tea and McVitie's Digestives. It was one of the best times of my life.

    Also, I feel a comparable list of American cookies would just be all the Girl Scout flavors plus Oreos, because what else do you really need?

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  31. Shortbread for the win! Next time I'm at World Market I will have to pick up some of the other biscuits to try out. Hobnobs sound interesting.

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    1. Hobnobs are on the list for my next shopping trip there.

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  32. Marty, this series and this book sound wonderful! I have to check it out. I love all things British, and I feel like I'd enjoy as well as learn some things from this series.

    As much as I adore England, I've yet to get there. Hopefully planning a trip with an author friend for 2023. And, the only experience I've had with "biscuits" is shortbread, which is indeed very good. I will just have to endeavor in the future to explore more "biscuits" while snuggled in my "jumper" in my "flat."

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    1. Thanks, Kathy! Have a great time planning and going on your trip. You may need to order an assortment of biscuits ahead of time as ... research.

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  33. Congratulations on your new release. Your series is new to me, but I will certainly check it out.

    I spent a year in England as a student and developed opinions on cookies, oops, biscuits that have lasted my lifetime. They must be made primarily of butter. They must melt in your mouth after dipping in a cup of good, black, unsweetened tea. So, Shortbread, preferably homemade. The tea certainly will need to be. And Viennese whirls, if they are what I think they are (vanilla and chocolate melt icebox cookie made with a lot of butter). Put chocolate on a biscuit if you want, but make it a butter biscuit. Ginger is a better addition. Oreos aren't worth the trouble anywhere and I never could get excited about a biscuit named to sound good for you. A Peek Freens bourbon will do when shortbread is not in the budget. Though in Canada where I now live, buying imported cookies is never a bargain.

    That year in England taught me a few things about tea and culture. After about my 3rd attempt to buy a cup of black unsweetened tea in a shop, I gave up. Apparently if you didn't want milk, you must want lemon and sugar. This was before Picard made "Earl Grey, black" a thing. I was too much of a young, uneducated American to go with the new experience. I made my own tea. I was there on a Rotary scholarship and we had to do meet-and-greets and after dinner speeches as part of the grant. At my first event, dinner was done and the waitperson asked if I wanted black or white? I asked for a cup of tea. Apparently, that could not be done. I learned to drink coffee.

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    1. Thanks! I, too, remember having to get used to the coffee after dinner!

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  34. Marty, I love this post! You've made me homesick for British biscuits. My top five:
    Chocolate digestives
    Shortbread
    Gingernuts
    Hob Nobs
    Plain digestives

    Weirdly, even having lived in the UK, I've never had a Bourbon or a Garibaldi. I must expand my biscuit horizons. And check out your series, which sounds like a real treat!

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    1. Thanks, Deborah! Isn't it fun to write about Britain? I agree ginger nuts should be high on the list. They take dunking so well.

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  35. Jaffa cakes, custard creams, garibaldis, and rich teas are the biscuits we always eat while in the UK. Looking forward to getting them again on our next trip to the Cotswolds and London in April.

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    1. It shows we know where our priority lies! We're heading back in March for the first time in two years and really looking forward to it.

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  36. These top four are my top four! And my Welsh grest sung used to bake amazing Eccles cakes! Luckily we have supermarkets with a British section

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