Monday, July 15, 2013

Craving a lost jelly donut...

HALLIE EPHRON: Evie Ferrante in my new book THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN shares my passion for old fashioned jelly donuts. The ones you can't get.

Evie remembers jelly donuts...
"... coated with velvety powdered sugar, the light cakey donut left not a trace of the usual greasy film that said 'store-bought.' [... L]iterally jam-packed, front to back so every bite risked spurting some of the filling out the other end -- filling that was in a league of its own, too, thick and tangy and intensely raspberry. Not that pallid, sugary-sweet, gelatinous stuff that donuts were filled with these days."

The jelly donut I covet came from a Van de Kamps (before it turned into a mega-brand) "Dutch" bakery in the corner of the Thriftimart on Roxbury and Little Santa Monica near where I grew up in Beverly Hills. 

Just for the record, I also miss rootbeer Popsicles but I have no soft spot for Twinkies which I gather are about to reappear on store shelves with twice the longevity. Why are they coming back and not my beloved jelly donuts?

So today, sharing food memories. Any treats from your childhood you'd love to find today ... or perhaps are happy to never see again?
DEBORAH CROMBIE: I wasn't lamenting the demise of Twinkies, either. And longer shelf life--ugh! As for childhood favorites, I loved Fletcher's Corn Dogs from the Texas State Fair, but you can still get them at the fair and they're just as good. I liked Dreamsicles but have no idea if you can still get them!

One childhood treat I've resurrected in the last couple of years is root beer floats, but with Whole Foods Market's 365 Root Beer (the best of the naturals) and organic vanilla ice cream.

Ice cream--oh, my, we did make homemade ice cream when I was a kid, but I think that may be another post!

RHYS BOWEN: I yearn for the old fashioned candy shop, with the big glass bottles of hard candies. My favorite real treat there, because it was expensive, was called buttered Brazils. It was a Brazil nut in a little crisp bed of toffee. (I've never been fond of anything too sweet, apart from cotton candy which I adored and then felt sick afterward)

ROSEMARY HARRIS: I never "got" cotton candy. Probably a good thing for my teeth. No..I had other sweet treats. None of which I actually miss.

In my first book, Pushing Up Daisies, I had the body found with an empty box of candy (that was actually the case with the body that was the inspiration for the book.) I found a website called oldtimecandy.com - purely for research mind you - and what fun that is! All the candies you loved as a kid - and many are still available. Faves - Broadway rolls - ribbons of strawberry licorice. Loved 'em. And the insensitively named Chocolate Babies.

But Twinkies? Not interested. I was more of a Devil Dogs girl.

Hallie, you're the foodie, have you had a cronut yet? Some New Yorkers are going crazy for them. It's a cross between a croissant and a donut and people are lining up to get them. Insanity.

HALLIE: Cronut? Never heard of 'em. But I found a photo - they look delicious. Remember when Beard Papa Cream Puffs were hot?

HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN: Yeah, cronuts. I have to admit being weirdly curious. Like the bacon sundae at--Wendy's?

ANYWAY.  Old time candy? Teaberry Gum! And Black Jack gum. And Chuckles, which you had to eat by licking off the sugar first. And those candy bars that were in four parts, remember? I always tossed the mashmallow one.

One of my first summer jobs (c. 1965) was at the candy counter at the local dime store. I overdosed on peanut butter crunch things. I also never understood Pixy Stix, which were essentially straws full of colored sugar which you just poured into you mouth and onto your teeth.

Cotton candy? Weird, but fun to play with.  There's a chic restaurant in Boston that serves it for dessert!

ROSEMARY:
Skybars! I threw away the marshmallow bit too!


HALLIE: Give me your marshmallow! If you worked and worked it with your fingers you blended the chocolate in and turned it into warm taffy.

JULIA SPENCER-FLEMING: It doesn't look like they sell Dreamsicles anymore, Debs, but you can make your own Dreamsicle cocktail

Childhood food I miss? Well, my Spencer grandmother used to make the most heavenly southern Sunday dinners. Fried chicken, fried okra, green beans cooked with bacon, biscuits slathered in honey, mounds of butter-soaked mashed potatoes... you can see why she converted to heart-healthy food as they got older. In this case, it's not like the food isn't still available - it's just that it would take about three meals to induce a heart attack if I ate it now.

HALLIE: I am SO HUNGRY!

So Reds, is there a favorite treat you wish you could find... or enjoy the way you did when you weren't worried about sugar and chemicals and calories and... ?

64 comments:

Jack said...

I used to love a bottled soft drink called Delaware Punch, drank it all summer at the beach. Haven't seen it in 40 years, but I've never forgotten.

I think they still make Abba Zabba bars.

Joan Emerson said...

I’ve never liked cotton candy, but I did like orange Pixy Stix . . . Rhys’s Buttered Brazils sounds absolutely yummy. Ring Dings are the remembered treat from my youth, and I loved my grandmother’s fried okra . . . .

Lucy Burdette aka Roberta Isleib said...

Sorry to miss adding to this blog--I was away at an amazing family reunion to celebrate my mother-in-law's 100th birthday!

But I would like to be invited to Julia's grandmother's feast!

And speaking of soda, does anyway remember Vernor's?

Jerry House said...

Jelly donuts should be coated with real sugar, not powdered sugar. Instead of doing nothing as they have in recent years, Congress should mandate the return of root beer popsicles. Bring back my beloved Devil Dogs. Vernor's ginger ale is okay, but a bit too much on the sweet side; for golden ginger ale (rather than dry ginger ale) try Chelmsford ginger ale (unfortunately sold only in a few selected spots in Massachusetts and New Hampshire)-- when first produced it was sold in stone bottles (!). The insensitively named chocolate babies were called something far more insensitive a hundred years ago; they are pretty good but I'll take a Tootsie Roll over them any time. Chocolate frappes, yum, and chocolate malted frappes, yummier -- and forget the stupid accent over the "e."
I miss the old-fashioned Indian Pudding. Strawberry shortcake on real short cake and served with thick cream, not whipped. And you danged kids get off my lawn!

Ken Sullivan said...

Came across Chuckles at a Cracker Barrel in Utah last month and had to get a package. It was $1.29. The last time I bought some I'm sure it was at most a dime. Except for the licorice the flavors were very artificial. Used to like strawberry Charleston Chews when I was a kid but you couldn't pay me to try one now (if I could find one).

Gerald So said...

I was reminiscing about Hershey's Whoppers chocolate-covered malted milk balls yesterday, similar to England's Mars' Maltesers.

I used to consume Pepperidge Farm Sausalito cookies without a care. Now they seem too heavy to even contemplate. Ditto bacon cheeseburgers. Now bacon and cheese so easily bring to mind clogging arteries.

Kathy Lynn Emerson said...

Bagels from Katz's Bakery in Liberty, New York. I've never found any so good since. Hard rolls, too. Like a crusty bulkie.

Reine said...

Hank,
My source tells me you can still get Chuckles in the vending machine in the nook outside the ladies room in the Vanderbilt Hall lobby (107 Ave. Louis Pasteur).

Hallie,
I miss the homemade candies at the candy store across from the House of Seven Gables –– especially their peanut butter and molasses salt water taffy, maple walnut fudge, molasses "honeycomb" candy and peanut butter fudge.

I crave a chop suey sandwich at the Salem Willows for lunch followed by a bag of pink wintergreen popcorn and a scoop of maple walnut ice cream. For dinner I would go over to Marblehead and get a couple of clam rolls.

But more than anything I miss stopping off at my great-grandmother's house on Lafayette Street and joining her for piece of pork pie. She was the only one who would speak French with me when I was in high school. Everyone else wanted me to speak English. She never learned to speak English, so no one could tell her not to speak French.

Sandi said...

I'd give anything for one of my Great Grandma Kettlehorn's spiced donuts. I have the recipe but they just don't taste the same, probably because I think she fried them in lard. She gave a dozen to each family at Christmas, and because we lived farther away we got an extra dozen. They were stacked sideways in a zipper bag and frozen solid. When we got home they went straight into our giant chest freezer. I remember dangling half in the freezer, arms stretched as far as I could reach to grab that bag from the bottom. I'd chisel off a donut and gnaw on it. Even frozen they were the best I'd ever had.

My favorite candy bar was the Marathon bar. It was caramel in the shape of a loose braid, dipped in milk chocolate. I can see the wrapper - it was flat, red and yellow, and I can even picture it in the corner grocery store, low and next to the Charlston Chews (which I couldn't stand). I don't know why it was called "Marathon" - it disappeared pretty quickly!

For those who like rootbeer, floated or otherwise, try Sprecher's. It's easily my favorite.

Hallie Ephron said...

Jerry House - you have me howling! And remembering that frappes in California were called milkshakes. I loved it when it came in a metal can right off the milkshake machine (we have a green porcelain working model in our kitchen with 2(!) metal cans.)

Hallie Ephron said...

Ken Sullivan: I agree! Chuckles have no taste, IMHO. Except for the black ones, my favorites. Charleston Chews take your fillings out. We used to put them in the freezer.

Hallie Ephron said...

Whoppers are still out there! Love them. Remind me of the malt powder they used to put in milkshakes to make them malteds. Does anyone do that any more?

Hallie Ephron said...

Reine: molasses "honeycomb" candy! You are talking my language. Bet Rhys would like that too. You can still get "Molasses Chips" from Sees... still the best mainstream chocolatier around for my money.

Hallie Ephron said...

Sandi: those spiced donuts sound wonderful. What was in them that was "spiced?"

Karen in Ohio said...

Oh, gosh, when was the last time I had a root beer Popsicle? Must have been 1969. They were so good.

My favorite non-chocolate candy was Necco wafers, except for the licorice ones. Now I'd probably prefer those. For the same price as any other candy bar you got lots of different pieces, and they weren't overly sweet.

Every now and then I lament the demise of two hometown Hamilton, Ohio (aka Hamilton! there really was an exclamation point included in the name of the town for some time) institutions. One was Isgro's pizza, which my parents loved when I was pretty small, and it's the pizza by which all others are judged.

The other was Sip's doughnuts. Mr. Sipple made one kind of cake doughnut, plain or frosted in vanilla or chocolate. The machine that made them sat in the front window, so you could watch them being made on a sort of assembly line belt. They were hot and fresh, and absolutely delectable. When Steve and I got married the local bakery had cake doughnuts identical to Sip's, but they went out of business years ago, alas. Probably all for the best, as far as my figure is concerned.

Is Captcha turning into an eye test for anyone else?

Hallie Ephron said...

Karen: I think Captcha IS turning into an eye test for those of us who remember great doughnuts.

Sip's doughnuts sound perfect. I wonder, did doughnuts always leave that greasy scum in the mouth and we just didn't notice?

Hamilton Ohio! Home of Mad Anthony and the Mad Anthony Writers Conference!

Rhonda Lane said...

I'm another one who'd enjoy Julia's grandmother's feast. For Day Two of Riding the Cardiac Rapids, I'd like "fried banana peppers," an appetizer you see in some Kentucky restaurants and bars, then cornmeal-breaded catfish with hush puppies, cole slaw and real southern sweet tea. (They try up here nowadays to make sweet tea, bless their hearts. If I need a true fix, I go to Cracker Barrel. Good thing the two restaurants in this state are a ways away.) Dessert would be my mother's chocolate silk pie. I'm probably fortunate I never learned "country cooking."

Has anyone noticed watermelon doesn't taste the same? I think the flavor went out with the seeds, if you know what I mean.

Edith Maxwell said...

Hallie, the Van de Camp delicacy I remember was some lacy sugary pastry, can't even think of the name. To die for. As for candy - Bit O' Honey. JuJuBees. And for foods I don't let myself do these days: a big chunk of butter mashed into the middle of a baked potato. Corn tortillas fried in oil until they're soft. A milkshake.

Kaye Barley said...

I miss the old fashioned soft drinks you could get at a soda fountain - Lemon Blends and Cherry Smash.

Reine said...

A lime Ricky.

Ellen Kozak said...

You have to be from Milwaukee to miss "candy raisins" which were made, I think, by Stark or Zeigler. They bore no relation to real raisins, but were golden brown gummy candies (shaped like Dots) that tasted vaguely of ginger. My best friend and I would pool our money to buy a bag (29 cents back then) and share them on the mile and a half walk home from junior high-- whoever put in the extra penny got the last one if there was an odd number in the bag.

And about thirty years ago, there was a bakery near our summer home that made "apple pizzas"-- actually a big flat apple tart (and it was more tart than sweet) which, when eaten with Wisconsin sharp cheddar, was divine. (My roots are showing, I guess).

Reine said...

Hallie! I remember that Van de Kamp's! They also had a restaurant. With a windmill! Remember that? Did you know that former LA County DA John Van de Kamp is a grandson of the baker's founder? I love food trivia.

Karen in Ohio said...

Reine, my first husband, who was 19 when we got married (I was 18), used to drink lime rickies when we went to "fancy" restaurants.

I haven't thought of those in years. Aren't they made with gin?

Karen in Ohio said...

Hallie, that was the first place we met, at the Mad Anthony Writers Conference a couple, three years ago.

Hallie Ephron said...

Rhonda - you got that right! The flavor DID leave with the watermelon seeds. I keep trying to find regular seeded watermelon but it's not there.

Hallie Ephron said...

Edith - I remember that sugary thing! It was like a cookie -- like an elephant ear with a layer of crackled sugar over it. They looked great. Taste? Not so much. I'm going to post a question in the Beverly Hills '50s-'60s group to see who remembers what they were called. Will report.

Hallie Ephron said...

Mmm, apple pizza sounds fantastic, Ellen Kozak! I googled and found this recipe: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/apple-crisp-pizza

Hallie Ephron said...

Ah! Karen, I love it when 'reality' and e-worlds collide. I just missed seeing Jane Biddinger who was here in Boston.

Rosemary Harris said...

Bit o'Honey, Charleston Chews...wow...they bring back memories. Of going to the dentist.
Jerry House - let's start a campaign to bring back Devil Dogs!
Hallie - I used to want one of those green milkshake makers! Must check ebay, although I have so many machines in my kitchen not sure where I'd put it.

While we're talking donuts...donuts? or Doughnuts?

Leslie Budewitz said...

Oh, you are all making me hungry -- even for things I've never had! I'm sad that A&W stopped making curly fries -- something about them was just better than the straight ones! And I miss Wilcoxson's Ice Cream, esp the pumpkin only available in Nov and Dec. I fondly remember my Girl Scout troop field trip to the creamery in Billings. It's still in business, but doesn't ship to this end of Montana.

I'm surprised that real jelly doughnuts haven't made a comeback -- Hallie's making a great case!

Denise Ann said...

I generally like plain cake donuts (there is a wonderful version, apple cider donuts, at our weekly farmer's market). But when my children were little, and the baby would wake early,and we were here in Falmouth at my in-law's, I would take the baby out, stop at a bakery that opened at 6 a.m. and get a fabulous blueberry filled jelly donut. We headed to the beach to hang out until the rest of the household woke up.

As for candy -- I loved Bonomo's Turkish Taffy and I still love (if I can find them) Planter's Peanut bars.

These days, I usually get a bag of m&ms if I need a "fix."

Thanks for this yummy discussion.

Hallie Ephron said...

Denise Ann: plain or peanut?

Lisa Alber said...

The first thing I thought of was food from my dad's restaurant, but setting that aside...I have been thinking about the ice cream sundaes we used to get at Ghiradelli's in San Francisco. Lori Roy mentioned sundaes in passing in her latest novel.

I thought, I'll never eat a sundae again. Isn't that sad?

Of course, I've been pining for a sundae ever since...loads of hot fudge sauce that pools around the bottom of the dish, nut sprinkles, mounds of whipping cream, and, of course, the toxic cherry on top. :-)

The closest I get to a sundae these says is, maybe, perhaps, one scoop of ice cream in a dish (not even the cone!)...

Karen in Ohio said...

There seems to be a distinct difference in camps: yeast vs. cake doughnuts. My husband always likes the glazed yeast doughnuts, while I'm firmly in the cake camp. They dunk better, for one thing.

Rosemary, that's the way I was taught to spell it in the 50's. I think "donut" is a more recent variation, but I have no authority to back that up with.

Hallie Ephron said...

Oh, I remember Sundaes, too, Lisa... back before calories counted. Near us was Blums and I loved their tin roof sundae -- vanilla ice cream heaped in a bowl, topped with hot fudge and hot salted peanuts. Yup. loved the fudge that was in the bottom of the dish. ALL HAIL the toxic cherry!!
(Confession: I can easily put away a jar of maraschino cherries in a single sitting.)

Deb said...

Ro, laughing over Bit o' Honeys--my mom used to make me eat those when I had a loose tooth. Pulled the tooth right out. No muss, no fuss:-)

Rhys, we have an old fashioned candy store here in McKinney: http://www.momandpopcorn.com/

I'll take you next time you come to Dallas!

I never liked candy very much (weird kid, yes...) but I miss the old-fashioned ribbon-curls and hard candies we used to get in our Christmas stockings. They were so pretty!

Nix on the sodas, too, except for Root Beer. My mom always gave me Canada Dry Ginger Ale when I was sick so you can imagine how I feel about that. I do like really spicy ginger beer like the Jamaican Reed's, though.

And we used to get a fizzy apple drink in Mexico. Don't remember what it was called but I loved it, and we would always bring back cases.

Deb Romano said...

The two things I miss the most were never available in stores: my dad's homemade cream cheese cake and his homemade crusty bread. YUM to both of them! We think the recipes died with him.

When I was in Fourth Grade I almost killed myself, or so I thought, on Pixy Stix. I brought one to have as a treat after lunch. Our school did not have a cafeteria so we ate lunch at our desks. I sucked in a little too much of the sugar...it came pouring out of the straw and straight into my throat...and I was afraid I would choke to death! My teacher jumped up from her chair and ran to my aid. I think she told me to raise my hands above my head. Then she sent me out to a drinking fountain in the hallway. I think I had Pixy Stix only once or twice after that; I was too scared to really enjoy them anymore.

When I was growing up,there was a billboard in the downtown area of my home town that declared "Candy is wholesome food. Eat more of it." I think it was an advertisement for Bonomo's Turkish Taffy and/or Mary Janes. We were never successful in getting our parents to take the sign's message seriously...

Gigi Norwood said...

12I'm with Kaye. I miss the old fashioned soda fountain drinks. When I was a kid we had a soda fountain/candy store within a short bike ride of my house where I could get a lime phosphate that was to die for. There was a bookstore right next door to that soda fountain, so I was up there all the time!

Lisa Alber said...

Hi Hallie!

My dad used to keep a giant jar of maraschino cherries in the fridge. Want a quick snack? Grab a handful. I shudder, thinking about it now. :-)

Hank Phillippi Ryan said...

Oh, DebRo--that is SCARY! Yikes. Deadly candy.

I do love MAry JAnes! You can still buy those. Another favorite of dentists, I bet.

And a lovely librarian I spoke to this weekend says she misses HOstess snowballs. Remember? She was so funny--she said "Everyone is talking about the return of Twinkies, but no one is standing up for Snowballs!"

Hallie Ephron said...

Hank, I DO remember hostess snowballs. But if you threw away the marshmallow in a Skybar you'd a choked on a snowball.

Deb Romano: That's some near death experience.

Which reminds me, why DO we tell kids to put their arms up when they're choking. It makes absolutely no sense.

readmore said...

Julia, I grew up with the same type of foods, and green beans cooked with bacon grease was the only way to go. I can't eat like that so much these days, but I occasionally enjoy the bacon grease infused green beans with a touch of added sugar. Did you ever have corn pudding? My husband thought this dish was rather unusual, but I grew up with it, too.

Gram said...

The best root beer aside from that at the soda fountain was Leary's. I think it was just in New England. Yes you are correct about the capchas. Dee

readmore said...

I meant to add to my previous post that I look forward to seeing you wonderful authors at Bouchercon in September and revisiting this topic in person.

PeggyE said...

My grandmother used to make cakes that were more like sweet breads (with apple or cherry, or a sweeted cheese filling that was the best!)She would pour the ingredients right on her wooden kitchen table & mix & knead it. Unfortunately no recipes were written down.

Denise Ann said...

Plain m&ms -- my husband loves peanut m&ms, but will leave the plain alone.

Hostess sno-balls! My mother shopped in the day-old store and I would have TWO SNOBALLS in my lunchbox. Sounds sickening to me today.

Kaye Barley said...

I hesitate about sharing this, but just cannot restrain myself. I had a sundae for supper last night. With whipped cream and I asked for two cherries. I love being a grown-up, I take that to mean I can eat what I want when I want and last night nothing would do but a sundae (plus we're on vacation, so that's always a good excuse). :-)

Pat D said...

Delaware Punch is still around; a local hot dog chain, James Coney Island, has it. And we bought Vernor's ginger ale when we lived in Ohio. It's still available.I had a terrible sweet tooth when I was a kid. I bought Pixy Stix at a store near my elementary school; graduated to sweet tarts later. My favorite Halloween swag was Tom's Peanut Butter Logs. It was hard and crunch, a texture like inside a Butterfinger. And later I loved a candy made in Belgium, I think. I think they were called napoleons. A hard candy shell, usually lemon, with a liquid center. Wonderfully sweet and tart at the same time. Can't find them anymore.

Edith Maxwell said...

Hallie, putting your arms straight up in the air DOES make sense. My sister learned that as an exchange student in Germany. If you're coughing from something that went down the wrong way, as they say, it totally works. It straightens the esophagus and trachea and lets air pass through. Try it.

And by the way, the Van de Camp pastry I'm thinking of tasted heavenly as well as looking so. We also had one of the restaurants with the windmill, in Arcadia.

All this brought back the neighborhood bread and pastry truck. It went slowly along the street, stopping when housewives came out, and you could buy doughnuts and bread directly from him. The sides were wooden and the guy would prop them up. Can't remember the name or if they had music like the ice cream truck. Hallie, did you have that in Beverly Hills?

Hallie Ephron said...

Yup, Edith Maxwell, we DID have the bread truck. I think they sold Hostess Cupcakes and other goodies that we never bought. We also had a fruit and vegetable truck that came to the house. Sides dropped down. same deal.

I saw there's a vegetable BUS that's making the rounds somewhere - a mobile farmer's market - which reminded me of Johnny our vegetable man.

Hallie Ephron said...

Kaye Barley: You are so outed!

PeggyE that sounds delicious!

readmore: I love bread fried in bacon grease. And corn pudding is divine!

Denise Ann: Just imagining eating two snoballs is enough to make me sick.

Reminding me of the sardine sandwiches I used to get... that's another blog, foods we'll be happy to never meet again.

Brenda Buchanan said...

Cracker Jacks, anyone? Salty and sweet, a combination for the ages.
No trip to Fenway would be complete without a bag (buy me some peanuts and cracker jacks . . .)

There is a popcorn store just a few doors down from my office that offers gourmet flavors such as salted caramel and mexican chocolate. It is better than you would think (says she, who has a frequent buyer card . . .)

But on the youthful treats: Necco wafers were a fave. On the playground outside of St. Bernard's we would pretend they were communion hosts until the nuns scolded us that it was sacrilegious. Also loved root beer barrels and salt water taffy (another efficient method of tooth extraction).

As a kid, I ate only plain M & Ms (and hoarded the red ones) and as an adult I eat only peanut (and still save the yummy reds for last).

Hallie Ephron said...

Cracker Jacks - I love 'em too, Brenda. There used to be a Necco factory in Cambridge and the whole area smelled sugary. And Baker Chocolate used to have a factory where I live south of Boston and the whole area smelled of chocolate, even years after they closed, especially on a hot day. (Like today)

Karen in Ohio said...

readmore, my mother made corn pudding, too. It was one of my favorites.

Since it involved a bunch of soda crackers I'd never eat it now, though.

Brenda Buchanan said...

I remember thst Necco factory, and envied the kids who lived nearby, assuming they got free samples occasionally. This was based on my personal experience living next door to a Hood warehouse, which we called Hoodsies.

On days like today, the guys who worked there would open a carton of actual Hoodsies - those individual vanilla and chocolate ice cream servings in red and white waxed paper cups with flat wooden spoons - and hand them out to all the sweaty kids in the neighborhood.

We loved those guys.

Deb Romano said...

The bread and pastry truck went through our neighborhood but my family never bought anything from it, much to the disappointment of us kids!

We never had soda except for birthdays and holidays. It still gives me a thrill to see the old-fashioned Coca Cola bottles, particularly in reprints of the old ads showing Santa Claus holding a Coke Bottle!

Karen in Ohio said...

My dad drove a bread truck for awhile when I was a kid!

Reine said...

Hallie, I lived with my grandmother for a while near that Baker's Chocolate factory... down Dot Ave, just the other side of the Carney. My great-grandmother Troy predicted rain by the smell of the chocolate. My uncle, criminal attorney Tom Troy, used to joke and write poems about "verdict by Baker's Chocolate."

Reine said...

Hi Karen,

No, lime Rickey's are nonalcoholic... just fresh lime juice, sugar and plain soda water. My great-grandmother Troy used to make them with a seltzer bottle.

What kind of corn pudding? On my mother's side it's a standard. We bake it with cornmeal, milk, eggs, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ground cloves.

Karen in Ohio said...

Maybe I'm thinking of a gin rickey. Heck, it's only been 43 years!

My mother's corn pudding was canned creamed corn, canned whole corn, crushed soda crackers and egg, baked.

Reine said...

Oh I've had that, Karen. My family called it escalloped corn. It was very good.

I heard that some people use the lime rickey base to make alcoholic drinks. Sounds like it would be very good with gin. Maybe that's what you had.

Lynda said...

There aren't many foods I miss, and certainly not any of the Hostess products. My mom and grandmother were such excellent cooks and bakers that my friends always tried to get me to trade what was in my lunch bag for their store-bought desserts. Ha! No way!

The Vermont Country Store catalog has a great collection of old time candies, including Walnettos, Bit-O-Honey, Necco Wafers, Bonomo Turkish Taffy, Filled Raspberry Candy, Original 1928 Double Bubble Gum.

http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/store/

Jerry House said...

NECCO also sells rolls of chocolate NECCO wafers, although they are hard to find. The deal (supposedly) is that if you bit into one in a completely dark room you'd see a spark. I kept testing that theory with my daughters when they were young. We never saw any sparks but we sure enjoyed a lot of chocolate NECCO wafers!

Mark Bennett Buddy Roth said...

For Deb Romano:
Thank you so much for mentioning the "Candy is wholesome food Eat more of it" sign! I have quoted it often and wondered if I didn't make it up.
My sign was above the candy shelves at the Pantry Pride Supermarket in Philadelphia in the early 1970s.