Sunday, April 19, 2020

From Our Windows to Yours

DEBORAH CROMBIE: We have all been spending a lot of time looking out of our windows these last few weeks.  We are all trying to find little things to take pleasure in these days, the small moments of our lives, so we are, I think, paying more attention to what we see around us. And just knowing that others are having the same experience helps us feel connected.

I was absolutely riveted by a piece in last week's New York Times about just that. They asked seventeen New York artists to capture the view from their windows, and I've gone back and looked at these depictions over and over.

Of course we've also been having a fun bit of voyeurism, seeing into people's homes on  Instagram and Facebook videos (my favorite is writer and cookbook author David Leibovitz's daily cocktail hour from his apartment in Paris) but I also found it fascinating to see what people are seeing when they look out. So I thought it would be fun if we shared our views with you, and then perhaps you could describe in the blog comments what you see when you look out your window!


Here's my view from my living room window. This is what I see when I sit to chat on the phone, or to read. We live on a very busy corner so there are always people driving by, even in the lock-down, but now we are also seeing lots of people walking their dogs. And of course our dogs have to bark like mad at every single one.


And this is my view from my kitchen window, across the deck. Beyond the fence there is always traffic, but in a few weeks (assuming I can figure out how to get some flowers) it will be a little oasis outside our back door.


 LUCY BURDETTE: Debs, there is a new group on Facebook too called “the view from our window.” People from all over the world posting--it’s amazing and somehow reassuring. It’s so quiet here in Key West--none of the hustle bustle we’re used to. I think we are all feeling like T-bone in this view out our side deck--something very important and thrilling is out of reach!



I watched David Lebovitz this week--lots of fun! And I have to say that John and I have a running commentary on the state of reporters’ offices on the PBS Newshour. We’re pretty sure one guy must have gotten scolded by his wife and moved the camera to a vantage point that was less messy LOL!

HALLIE EPHRON: When I rolled up the shade in my office this morning, here’s what I saw. 



Seriously? We’ve had no snow all winter and now it decides to frost the forsythia and Japanese quince. You can see my office view is truncated - a fence between our property and our neighbor’s driveway. They’re great neighbors, with a baby and a toddler, swing set in the backyard. We’re surrounded by young families - we had a one-year-old when we bought our house from a woman who was in her 80s and had been here for 60 years.


RHYS BOWEN: I’m lucky in that I’m stuck at our winter home in Arizona where I live in a lovely little private community surrounded by mountains. So the view from my office window brings me delight as I work. I had to do a virtual tour for Goodreads this week so here’s the link for you to take a tour of my office and see my view

The one thing I don’t see is people or life going on. In fact the other day I was looking out and felt like the Lady of Shalott!


DEBS: Rhys, see the orange rose in my little bouquet, front and center? 


That's David Austin's Lady of Shallott and it is gorgeous! Now I'll think of you when I see it! And I'll happily share some of my traffic with you!

JULIA SPENCER-FLEMING: I also had a snowy view this morning - New England has decided to remind us we can never count on it being spring until it’s practically over. 

The view Sunday morning - no snow!

It’s funny you bring this subject up, Debs, because I was talking (from ten feet away) with a neighbor a few days ago, when I was out walking the dog. We’ve both lived in our tiny neighborhood on either side of a county highway for over thirty years, and in that time, we’ve seen traffic change from almost non-existent to a vehicle every 30-40 seconds. Exploding housing prices in Portland have been driving people out to more distant communities, with a commensurate rise in commuter traffic.

That’s changed. Now, when I sit at my desk facing the road, I look up when I hear a car drive past, because they’ve become increasingly rare. It’s both eerie, and pleasant. Do the Germans have a name for that sensation?                                      

JENN McKINLAY: I’m quite certain the Germans have a word for it, Julia! Since I live in a frat house, my view is one of chaos and mayhem. We don’t have red hair and there are only four of us, but we could easily be Weasleys. My desk looks out into the backyard, so the view from my window is a pingpong table, a punching bag in the shape of a dude (we call him Dickie, no idea why), the firepit, my ridiculous amount of potted plants in various stages of health, and the swimming pool. Last year, I gave Hooligan 1 a blow up Narwhal for his high school graduation. Of course, H1 blew him up for a pool party and he has floated in our pool ever since, so I frequently look up from my desk, and see “Wally” floating by. It’s ridiculous but he always makes me smile.



I live on a street that has a K-8 school at the end of it. I never thought I’d say this, but I miss seeing all the kids walking to and from school. It used to be they were loud and annoying and made the dogs bark, but now I miss the sounds of the laughter and the good natured yelling at each other as they all walked home. I think the dogs miss them, too.    

HANK PHILLIPPI RYAN:  Aw, Jenn. Yeah, I heard an airplane fly over yesterday--so eerie. The German word could be: ruhiggefahlzeitgeistgenugkeit. Quiet-danger-worldview-enough-ness. Does that work?

 The view out our back door always makes us laugh--which feels so bizarre these days. The ducks have taken on new and hilarious behaviors, and Jonathan says it’s their way of attempting to train us. These two guys are new-this-year-arrivals, Banded Duck and Wobbly (we think he has a hurt foot). They come right up to the back door and quack-quack-quack to be fed.




And a female, Eddy, flies, yes FLIES, to the back door when she sees me, and quacks like mad until I bring duck food. I open the door and come out, and she waddles at my side, following me to the place by the pool where they eat. It is truly out of Hans Christian Anderson--it’s there the little goose girl or something?



And yes, that’s SNOW on the white tulips. INSANE. I fretted all last night about whether I should cut them all and bring them in, which would be so sad. In true Hank fashion, I cut SOME of them. Easier to worry about the tulips than everything else.



DEBS: Hank, you are brilliant! Our new word-coiner! 

But now it's your turn, dear readers. Describe for us what you see when you look out YOUR window.

66 comments:

  1. Lovely window views [but I’m glad we missed the snow] . . . .

    Outside my window, the daffodils are beginning to droop, the Rose of Sharon is thinking about blooming. The trees are green and the deer are paying no mind to the social distancing requirements . . . they are simply wandering through. And, since we’re all staying home, there’s not much traffic passing by to startle them into dashing away.

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  2. I have one huge window wall that looks out into the back yard. I also have four dogs, so the window wall has a fairly heavy display of "nose art" on it. I have managed to get the 4' x 8' glass panel in front of my arm chair free of all smears and gunk, inside and out, so I have a beautiful view of my patio plant stand, the bird bath (more squirrels than birds, but I have seen a wren and a pair of doves) my giant oak tree, and my dogs, cavorting around the big back yard and barking at my neighbors. It's nice. I can see all the same things from the chair on my patio, but that view comes with mosquitoes, so inside is better.

    When I venture out the front to get the newspaper or the mail, I see my front borders which, this time of year, are a delightful tumble of roses, iris, and stuff that hasn't bloomed yet. I've been posting photos of the new blooms every day or so on my Facebook page. They make me happy, and my friends seem to enjoy them, too.

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  3. My bedroom windows see nothing special - the backside of the condo buildings across the parking alley from me.

    Out my living room and kitchen windows, I can see the main intersection in my condo complex. There are a couple of streets, more buildings, and some trees and plants. It's actually a nice view.

    However, today it was very dark and gray. I had to work on Saturday, and I only had the light over my work computer on. The rest of my condo was very dark at 5PM when it is usually sunny in here.

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  4. Our front view is framed by the satsuma tree which is busy changing blooms to fruit. The front gate has an arch where a morning glory vine is fighting the asian jasmine. The front fence is covered in jasmine flowers which smell heavenly and are making me sneeze. Centered in front of the porch is an angel trumpet that we refer to as a triffid. Ever see that movie? This triffid keeps shooting up and expanding and I take a saw to it frequently before it takes over. The magnolia tree is starting to bloom. We have tons of lizards and there is one who likes to perch on the mailbox and sun itself. Once past this jungle, which is actually quite compact, you see the street. Lots of walkers, dogs, kids, and people on bikes.

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  5. All the windows in my apartment (living room, bedrooms) face in the same direction... north. I live on a normally busy downtown street in Ottawa with hundreds of cars and buses going by everyday, and lots of people. So with the provincial State-of-Emergency in place since March 17, the bus/car traffic is down by 90%, so the street is soooo eerily quiet. And most days, good weather or not, I see less than 5 people walking along the sidewalk all day, usually walking their dogs.

    We are still getting snow flurries here but it's not sticking around since the temperatures now reach the mid-40s most days. The trees are still bare but starting to form buds, so spring will eventually so up here in Ottawa.

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    1. I wanted to add that the only persistent sign of life that has not changed since the lockdown are those darn squirrels. Since it is so quiet, I can hear a soft thump when they leap from a nearby tree and land on my balcony and try to get goodies from my compost bin.

      Does anybody have any good (natural) squirrel deterrents? I have tried cayenne pepper, and citrus/honey and also use netting to protect my herb planters.

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    2. I have four dogs, and even when they act as a pack they don't manage to deter the squirrels. Perhaps a pet owl? Squirrels and rabbits are what happen when natural predators get pushed out of an ecosystem.

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    3. Squirrels are the plague of my existence, Grace. If you figure it out, let me know!

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    4. Ha ha, Gigi, where would I get a pet owl?!
      And Debs, I am asking for help since I have tried some suggested natural solutions for squirrels which have not worked...but if I get something that DOES work, I will definitely post about it!!

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    5. One of my husband's projects was a video called Squirrel Wars, which he co-produced with the eminent naturalist George Harrison (the one from Wisconsin, sorry) for PBS. One of the most effective ways to keep squirrels off a feeder turned out to be to run a mild electric charge along where they travel. It ends up training them away.

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  6. Good morning Jungle Reds! Lovely photos of your yards.

    So, New England in spring, yeah. We woke up yesterday morning to gray skys and snow, about 4 inches of it. This morning it is already all melted and the sky is blue, with today's temperature going up to 60. That's better.

    I have a lovely back yard dominated by a huge old maple tree which is not in the best of health. There are tall spruces beside the house, probably planted when the house was built in the 1950's. They should be removed for our safety, but they are really lovely and we are stalling.

    We bought the house when Jonathan was 2, now he is living in Boston with a wife and 3 year old. Our yard is deep and because our home is on a cross street between two longish drives, you could see yards all the way up to main street about 15 houses away. It was like living in a park. Since then, the neighborhood homes have mostly changed hands a few times. Neighbors on those side drives have built sheds and one even put in a pool, so the view doesn't go that far unimpeded any more.

    My kitchen window looks out onto the street and there have always been lots of dog walkers, although there are definitely more now. There is a high school 3 blocks away and the kids and teachers drive by our house every day between 7:00- 7:30 and then all afternoon after 2:20. That is all very quiet now.

    My husband is the gardener and he tries to keep up with the many beds he has created. We are also trying to put in native plants and that will attract native birds and butterflies and bees, but not bears. Oh, my.

    All very suburban, we have gorgeous flowers everywhere with bushes and trees throughout the neighborhood. It is simply lovely in spring and fall. Then, a mere 2 minute drive takes you to groceries, hairdressers, etc. The best of both worlds.

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    1. Judy, it does sound lovely! I envy you your gardening husband, as mine does NOT...

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    2. But mine doesn't cook at all, nothing. So, it's a trade off.

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  7. The front windows of the house look out onto the street, which is always relatively quiet but these days is very quiet -- at least as far as cars go. The foot and bike traffic has picked up, and I see people and dogs of all shapes, sizes and ages getting in their daily exercise. We have a bird feeder on the front patio, so I also see flocks of juncos, a variety of woodpeckers, nuthatches and miscellaneous sparrows. And, squirrels, too. Oh, and last night, out the back bedroom window, we saw a LARGE racoon eating up the leftovers from the bird and squirrel feedings. We could see his/her masked face, even in the dark.

    Thanks, Deborah, for this post and thanks to all of you for the tips about sites to check out for other people's views from their windows. Fascinating to experience a larger world that way these days...

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  8. Wishing we could post pictures with the comments...

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    1. Oh, yes, that would be wonderful. But the images are so well drawn it's almost like seeing them.

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    2. Yes, me, too, but I love the descriptions!

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  9. Great photos of everyone's views! Rhys, loved the tour. Debs, the roses are gorgeous. Six months from now when everything has hopefully returned to normal, an update on your fall views would be spectacular!

    The view from my office depends on the window. Both face yard and beyond that a busy street (by country standards, traffic is now much diminished) and the Caloosahatchee River that serves as our across the street neighbors' back yards. My bedroom window overlooks the pool and landscaped front garden. The view from our kitchen is spectacular. We often see wildlife there, and the occasional escaped cow. The centerpiece is a huge live oak that is covered in honeysuckle.

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    1. Kait, that sounds fabulous! You are central Florida, right?

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    2. Yes, closest large city is Fort Myers, that's 35 miles west of us.

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  10. I looked out the main window of the living room and pretty much all I see is the neighbor's house across the street. It's not even 8am on Sunday morning so the neighborhood is still quiet and most are probably still asleep.

    I hear a bird every so often, chirping some noise of communication I guess. Other than the addition of people or cars going by, I doubt the view will change all that dramatically throughout the day.

    What little snow I got here is pretty well gone. In fact, most of it was gone before I even left my house yesterday to run a couple of quick errands.

    By the way, if you want to have a theme song for today's blog post I suggest the Tanita Tikaram song "World Outside Your Window" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c4zWJf1vVo

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    1. Thanks, Jay! Looking it up now!

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    2. Jay, I was also thinking of songs about looking out the window when I saw this morning's post. There were many references to that in songs of the '60's and '70's; Mamas and Papas, Rolling Stones, more...right?

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    3. Judy, I'm sure there are lots of songs about looking out windows. I'm not sure who did what when you go back to the 60's as that's not my best area of knowledge. I would venture to say that you are probably right though.

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  11. We have wonderful leaded glass windows all across the front of the house in a large curved bay. In the dining room, through an archway, another bay looks out over the back garden. Yes, we've had snow off and on all week, but it didn't stick. Today is sunny, and through my window I see the rhododendron beginning to bloom, fat buds on the lilacs and dogwoods, tulips ready to pop and one hyacinth already contributing its fragrance to the spring air. The forsythia is about done, the chickadees have once more taken over the wren house, but the new woodpecker house is still up for grabs. I wakened this morning to the sound of our little screech owl, who should have been heading to bed, the cooing of the mourning doves, and the bitch bitch birdie birdie birdie of the cardinals who nest in the Burning Bush.

    Inside it is abnormally quiet, only one jangle of tags on a dog collar, Penny is still searching searching for our Toby. Yesterday evening my friend Susan called. She had attended a virtual bat mitzvah, and during the ceremony she had said Kaddish for Toby. I was so touched. She suggested I tell Penny the story so she would understand why he wasn't in his usual place. And I did.

    Oh dear, I got so off topic. Please forgive me.


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    1. Oh Ann, I am so sorry. Sweet Toby. Give a hug to Penny, and I know your explanation helped. So difficult—and we all love you so much.

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    2. We're friends on Facebook, Ann. You show me your stained glass window and I'll show you mine? Hugs to you. I like the idea of telling Penny Lane all your favorite Toby stories.

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    3. Yes, ditto, Ann, on the Facebook view. I've been thinking of you all weekend. Poor Penny. I'm sure your stories helped. Hugs to you all.

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    4. Gigi, my leaded glass windows aren’t stained except for a small one in the front door. But I’ll post pictures of that later today. You’ve all see the front bay ones many times.

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    5. Ann, I am so sad for you, knowing how painful it is to loose a family pet. However, your story about your friend saying Kaddish for Toby reminded me of an absolutely hilarious family story that we have been laughing about for over 25 years. Sometimes family stories are only funny if you know the family, so I won't try to tell it, only say that I laughed out loud when I remembered it. So, thank you for a lovely memory this morning.

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    6. What a lovely thing for your friend to do.

      When my daughter's older dog died, the younger one was bereft for weeks. It is so hard to watch them grieve, especially since you are, too, and how do you comfort them?

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    7. Oh, Ann, so sorry for your loss. How lovely of your friend to say Kaddish. Keep talking to Penny, I'm convinced they know what we are staying, and feeling. Hugs to you both.

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    8. Ann, I'm so sorry for the loss of your dear Toby. I hope sweet Penny finds peace soon.

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  12. Everybody's out walking their dogs. Lots of street action in front. In the backyard, a recent storm stripped the flowering crabapple and serviceberry bushes, but the red bud swathed with full, pink-purple buds lining the branches. And, starting at noon, the three boys in the house behind us burst out of the garage and play basketball, baseball, and football non-stop till dinner time.

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    1. I think it would be wonderful to see the boys playing. I do see my granddaughter on the other side of the fence that runs along our driveway, as their backyard backs up to our driveway. So we talk from about twenty feet away, but I'm grateful for even that!

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  13. In my living room window , I see my fir tree that is a refuge for birds. Nothing is blooming now, it's too cold . During all last week and even this morning, we had strong cold winds that brought broken tree branches on the lawns. Two of my neighbours are now working on their lawns. Their is life around and the sky is blue for now.

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  14. It’s beautifully sunny here today, the sky is the purest blue again, this happens all the time now! The tulips seem to have survived,I can see them standing tall and happy, I got a lot of a variety called infinity, which starts out white and then evolve into pale pink, them very derp pink. Amazing. So I hope we are back to spring.

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    1. I envy you the tulips, Hank. They don't overwinter here. I used to plant them every autumn and loved seeing all the bright colors in the back yard in the spring. But then the squirrels started digging them up for snacks, so after a couple of years I gave up. I have to be content with the daffodils and iris.

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    2. Still waiting for tulips to bloom here, Hank. We have an annual tulip festival (cancelled due to COVID-19) here in Ottawa, so there are over 1 million tulips planted and waiting to bloom in mid-May. The organizers are planning some virtual events since we won't have the 750,000 visitors roaming to see the tulip beds.

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  15. Out my big front window, I see the beginnings of spring. The grass is greener, the daffodils just about to bloom, a few trees are close to budding, and the birds are back. And this morning the snow has melted and the sun is shining! My street is fairly busy with cars, bikers, and walkers all the time. Right now we have fewer cars but even more walkers. When it’s warm enough I sit on my front porch and watch the walkers— and the kids across and down the street. Not many families live near me, but apparently there are 5 kids between around 5-15 in this house. Every afternoon they are outside playing and arguing and laughing. It sounds so normal!

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  16. Loved seeing outside everyone's windows! Hank, I'm wondering if your ducks are descended from the Make Way for Ducklings ducks? I like to think they are anyway.

    When I look outside my window here by my desk, I see snow on the side deck that will probably be gone later today as the sun is shining so brightly. In the woods that surround the hose there is snow too and of course there are no leaves on any of the trees so I can almost see the road - very little traffic - and the neighbor's house across the road. When the leaves are full on I can't see any other signs of civilization at all! Not seeing any birds or other wildlife right now. One day a robin came right up to my patio door; I have no idea where it thought it was. Could he look inside and see my ficus tree that was right there?

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  17. I look out the window most when I'm in my upstairs office. The windows are to my right and point eastward onto the quiet street and the houses opposite. Being an early bird, I sometimes get treated with sunrises painted by a celestial artist. I track all the dog walkers, the odd guy who limps to the bus every day, and the changing birds in the huge old swamp oak that towers over our house. My across-the-street neighbor has his huge garden all ready to plant, and the two special-needs high school girls in the foster house wave at me when they walk down the street with their foster mom. Daffodils bloom around my lamp post and my baby spicebush tree is about to leaf out.

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    1. Beautiful, Edith! Thank you. I can see it perfectly!

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    2. I have never heard of a spicebush tree, and had to look it up online, Edith.
      Native to the mid-west US, so I guess that is why I have never seen one?

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    3. Edith, are you talking about the native spicebush, or the spicebush viburnum?

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    4. Karen, I have no idea! I believe it's the native one, but I will have to ask (it was planted by a memorial tree planting program in honor of a dear late friend who planted hundreds of native trees in our town).

      Grace, it was a favorite tree of my late tree-planting friend Richard - who was from Illinois and Indiana!

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  18. Thanks for all the window views--photos and descriptions! My front window overlooks our quiet road--rural and quiet always, but a car going by now is an event. The magnolia tree was in full bud, but the cold snap has turned all those buds to brownish-pink. Happens too often to get upset. Maybe next year! There is also a bird feeder or kitty theatre in front of the window. Love those mornings when there's a red-bellied or downy woodpecker at the feeder. Facing south, the patio doors overlook the backyard and my neighbors' backyards, too. Last week I saw a red fox on private business at the very back of the yard. There is a bird feeder stationed near the patio, too. Lots of bird life to entertain us. And reassuring to see the neighbors out and about, preparing garden beds, mowing--the usual activities this time of year.

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  19. Here in Toronto, the view of my backyard and laneway from my upstairs office window is still in winter mode, even at half-past April. Not a leaf in sight, though the forsythia are trying hard.

    Yesterday I enjoyed a video chat with my friend Karen in Nashville, and we compared views. Hers of course, is all lush and green. Practically summer.

    Well, it will come. Yes.

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  20. What a wonderful topic! I'm so glad to join the conversation--and so glad that I have plenty of windows. Typically, I'll be sitting near one of three windows, all of which give me a close-up view of bird feeders. What a gratifyingly busy time of year for birdwatching. Dozens of cardinals, bluebirds, an tiny goldfinches among the most colorful, and a red-bellied woodpecker hanging out at the suet feeder. The view from my office window shows my small cottage garden at its best: phlox. Columbine, yellow spikes of Baptisia, and peonies about to bloom. These amazingly sunny days have encouraged luxuriant growth--and have encouraged walkers in the neighborhood. I watch people go by, either solo or with their dogs, and my little Norwich terrier Andy, watches, too, sitting on an ottoman in front of the office window. He's interested in people-watching, but gets really excited when he spies a squirrel at the feeder. Hysterical barking ensues. Altogether, I am grateful for warm weather and signs of spring--and grateful that I have windows!

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    1. Katie, I LOVE cottage gardens! My peonies are about to bloom, too. Hope today's storms don't damage them. The bird feeder on the deck is busy all day, and the hummingbirds are visiting the coral honeysuckle that grows up the pergola. However, we had a flock of cedar waxwings come through yesterday so everything in the back is covered with purple bird poop. I love the waxwings, they are such pretty and cheerful birds, but oh my do they make a mess!

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  21. I love that we are seeing everywhere from Canada in the north to Florida and Texas in the south! It's like a moving picture of spring. We still have iris blooming here, but it's the roses that are spectacular now. On my walks I keep track of all the neighbors' gardens.

    We live in an old house on a big corner lot in the historic district in our town. The street on our north side is the main thoroughfare between the normally very busy town square and the freeway. Lots of big old trees in our neighborhood, lots of native plants and roses in our yard. My downstairs desk is in the sun porch, overlooking the back yard and the deck. Cardinals are chirping this morning, bright scarlet against the green of our spring fescue in the lawn. But it's gray here today and there are storms predicted this afternoon.

    My project for today --along with cleaning the house-- is to wash the front porch. I've got some new throw pillows coming for the porch swings and I can't wait to freshen things up for spring. When I get it all done, and somehow get a few flowers in my pots, I'll post a pic on Facebook.

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  22. I loved all the photos and what a great topic for today. My dining room is in the front of the house(old house, multi renovations over century-plus) and there is a bay window that overlooks the quiet, city, residential street. I can see my small front garden, where the daffodils look cheerful, the tulips didn't last, and there is an anemic bleeding heart I planted last fall, blooming way too early. The lilac is budding. The original gas lamp is still there with its tiny flame. Across the street I see a giant school yard with a small playgournd and that rare city treasure: lots of open space. (The school front is on the avenue that crosses our street up the block) Normally, on weekday mornings it is full of running,shouting laughing children before school, gradually forming into class groups to go in. There are outdoor gym classes complete with boom-box music. After school and on weekends, there are big kids practicing basketball and little ones learning how to stay upright on scooters or skates. Normally, there is lots of cheerful noise and always something to see from my front windows.A lifetime ago, some of those children were my daughters. A month ago, they were my granddaughters. Today, on this bright, brisk Sunday morning, in these not at all normal times, the school yard is completely quiet.

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  23. These are great. My office window looks out on to the barnyard and right now I can see our flock of sheep staring at me, willing me to stop working on my book and come down to feed them. There's an escaped chicken pecking around in the dirt. I can also see my middle kid, still in pajamas, out in the field with his metal detector, looking for treasure (rusty old nails and spoons.) And, I see THE SUN! I'm going to finish the chapter I'm working on and get out into the sunshine, which has been scarce lately.

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    1. Suggest to your son to try metal detecting where the tractor parks. I used to find lots of coins in that area.

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  24. Reds, I loved all of your descriptions and Rhys loved the tour of your space. Here in Atlanta I live on the 15th floor of a condo that fronts on Peachtree Road, the main artery in this city. However from my desk I see a large Baptist church, the Episcopal cathedral, and the Catholic cathedral. Yes, I live near what is called "Jesus Junction". But more importantly I see trees and trees. On either side of Peachtree behind the churches and the high-rises are neighborhoods and lots and lots of trees. If you have ever flown into Atlanta you have seen trees and sometimes we are called the city of trees. Although it is raining today, I have seen birds on my balcony and there is usually an re hawk or two in the sky. One of them loves to sit on the steeple of the Baptist church and look for prey.The early spring flowers are gone so we are into peonies and others now.

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  25. Wonderful photos and descriptions, everyone! If we all learn one thing from this crisis, maybe it's to appreciate what we have right in front of us.

    The property where we just built our home has been in the family since 1962, but I've not spent a lot of time here, even though it is a half-mile from our old house. So I'm enjoying seeing what is here already, and learning what each season brings. My father-in-law's own father was a landscape gardener, and he had a deep appreciation for both cultivated plants and the wild native ones. He planted a couple of beech trees here, including one in front that is truly beautiful. I worked really hard to keep construction from hurting it, and I hope it paid off. We will see.

    Under the beech tree right now is a plot of mayapples, looking for all the world like fairy umbrellas. Steve says there are more in the woods behind the house, but I can't navigate the steep hillside to see for myself. This plot is about to bloom, which is really cool. We also have a flowering crabapple I didn't know was here, and both a pink and a white dogwood. There's a little grove of spicebush underneath a large Chinese Chestnut, which will bloom someday soon.

    But the best part was the bulbs. My FIL planted hundreds of daffodils, several different varieties. I knew about two of them, but didn't realize the rest because things had gotten so overgrown here. What I didn't know about was the mass of snowdrops along the side of the driveway. They were gorgeous.

    So even though the front yard is still pretty barren, and the backyard is an expanse of green back to the woods, there are so many lovely little surprises.

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  26. We have lived on Nome St. since 1999. A year ago, I convinced my daughter to allow 'stained glas overlay' in the living room. I now can see out. I see a quiet street, now marked with Fed Ex and UPS trucks, an infrequent yard man. As I look around the yard, I see gardening projects galore. Hurricane season approaches. It is time to cut back all the branches and the philodendrons. From the back window, more projects. The pampas grass has slowly overtaken the yard. The bamboo is now 20 feet tall, swaying over the roof -- and into the new neighbors space. A solitary tennis shoe lies forlornly by the bamboo. Prank? Dog treasure? A pirate is missing his shoe? One wonders.

    The seasons have shifted this week from Dry to Wet. Currently (12:15 PM) it is 84 degrees. Relax my friends Summer is heading your way.

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  27. Love, love, love your photos and videos (Rhys' youtube link). What am I seeing outside my window? Green landscaping and many green trees. Clear blue skies instead of smoggy air. We have Spare the Air Days too often! Not now with shelter in place.

    Diana

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  28. I love reading the descriptions of what everyone sees out their windows. Fabulous! I am grateful that we have such an active yard area - it has definitely helped keep the stir crazy to a minimum. Happy Sunday to you all!

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  29. It's all about the birds for my husband and me when looking out the windows, especially the kitchen windows. We have been putting feed out for the birds for quite some time, and we love to look out and see lots of cardinals, the bright red males and the less colorful females (one day I counted 16, but usually arouond 6 or 8); mourning doves, usually just a pair of these; brown thrasher, only one of these seems to be hanging around, and its a favorite of mine; plenty of sparrows, sweet little birds; some robins, even though they aren't there for the feed; more grackles than we want, not a favorite with my husband and me; and a new one, a house wren, that we at first thought was some sort of sandpiper because of its long beak (I'm really interested in this one). We used to have a hawk handing around, but it seems to have moved on. I enjoy hawks, but I'm just as glad it moved on, as I feared for our bunnies. The squirrels seem to be absent lately, but we usually see three or four of those. Out my front door, a double door with clear glass panes, I can watch the phoebe bird that has built its nest, once again, on the light fixture on the porch ceiling. I'm only seeing the one mother bird right now. I used to see both birds involved in the babies, but I don't know where the other has gone. The robins like to hand out around front, too, and husband said he saw our house wren out front this morning. I'm not happy about that, as I feel the house wren would be safer and more likely to stay with us in our back yard. My husband and I laugh at ourselves and our interest in these birds, saying that we've become old people doting on our birds. We have plans to extend this interest when it's warmer and safer, to some trails near our house. Oh, and the window I look out as I sit here typing or reading or watching TV gives me a beautiful green view, with our neighbors bushes and trees, the tip of my beloved front yard tree (that is going to have to be cut down), and the tip of our green grass.

    For those of you who know and are friends on FB with M'Lou Greene, I have to mention her bird photographs, since I've been talking about my fascination with birds. M'Lou has the most beautiful photos she takes of the most interesting birds. I encourage you to follow her postings.

    Thanks, Reds, for the views out your windows today. And, Lucy, I'm going to look up that FB group. Thanks.

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  30. I look out my window and look up. When I look straight out there is a brown fence enclosing my apartment patio but beyond the fence, looking up, I see the deciduous tree with its slightly flakey gray trunk and soft green leaves. I'm looking right at it and am realizing the leave seem to flutter on their twigs much like trees of the cottonwoods family, so now I need to get my tree book out and if I'm even close. The other tree is a coastal redwoods with it's thick, fiberous bark of dark rusts and the droopy branches of mid dusty green needles ending with the new, sort green tips of Spring. There isn't a lot of it but the sky I see is not bright but a dull grey/white color so I bet when I go out, I'll see overcast skies. At times I see a bushy tailed grey squirrel on the fence, twitching about looking for what the little guy is looking for and lately there has been a small black headed, grey bodied bird that keeps reminding me of a chickadee. I think I've only seen the one but there has to be a mate somewhere.

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    Replies
    1. Deana, you made me want to paint that with your detailed description!

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    2. Deana, you make even the grays and browns come alive.

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  31. Could not let Hitchcock's Rear Window go unmentioned.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rear_Window

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