Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Hitting the LIST!

HANK: I just read SUCH a good book. I mean--it is riveting, irresistible, and a truly--I can say this because it's just us-- annoyingly fabulous idea.  

Let me fast forward. How much fun would it be to wake up and see your novel on the New York Times bestseller list?  

Wouldn't it be worth all the travails, ad all the editing, and all the second guessing?

With cheers and a standing ovation, we welcome the wonderful Julie Clark to Jungle Red.  Go right out and get his book. (Well, not right now, I mean, but after you read this interview.)

HANK: Okay, first things first. When and how did you hear about the NYT list?  And what happened then?

JULIE CLARK: We’d been monitoring sales pretty closely over the course of the week, and I knew that Wednesday was the day we’d know for sure. I tried to stay really busy. I was at Pages: A Bookstore in Manhattan Beach, signing their stock for an event we were hosting. Then I was up at Diesel Brentwood signing the orders that came in after my book launch there. I’d been distracting myself with house chores and was actually on my spin bike when my editor called with the news that I’d hit the list at #9. And after that it was a flurry of phone calls – to my agent to celebrate with her, to some close friends and of course my family. The following morning, I was able to do a Zoom call with the entire Sourcebooks family to celebrate with the other authors who’d also hit the list that week. It was tremendous, thrilling, everything you’d imagine it to be.


HANK:  So—your book is irresistible. I adored it.  Did you love it as you wrote it?  Or did it change a lot? Was there a time when you thought—whoa. This works! Tell us a tiny bit about the realization of plot success.

JULIE: I knew the idea was a big one, and a very compelling one, almost right away. In 2016, when I was talking with agents about representation, they all ultimately asked "what are you working on next?" When I pitched the idea of The Last Flight -- two women who trade tickets at an airport, then one of the planes goes down -- I got a gasp from every agent I spoke to. Likewise, as I was promoting The Ones We Choose in 2018, I'd answer the same question at book events, and I'd get the exact same gasp. I knew then that I'd better do everything I could to make the execution as good as the concept.

Writing it was incredibly hard, and there were plenty of times I wondered if I'd be able to pull it off. In mid 2018, I became tempted by a new idea, and wondered, after my agent had sent a draft of The Last Flight back to me once again telling me it was still not there, if I should maybe set it aside and work on something else. But I just kept plugging away, revising and rewriting for the entirety of a year before we sold it to Sourcebooks in a pre-empt in May of 2019.


HANK: How was writing this different from The Ones We Choose?

JULIE:  I had to do a lot of research for The Ones We Choose, since there is a genetic subplot that required me to learn about genetics. I consulted pretty regularly with a geneticist as well, to make sure I was getting the science right. With The Last Flight, my research was centered on law enforcement and flight regulations rather than on science. Even though Eva was a chemistry prodigy, I was able to stay away from diving into chemistry and chemical reaction research for this one!


 HANK:  This is SUCH a brilliant premise! Was there a moment when you thought of this idea? Just--ping? Or is it an amalgam?

JULIE: I’d been fascinated by the idea of whether someone could vanish…originally, I’d thought about a person who used something like 9/11 to disappear. But then I decided to pivot to a less sinister event and instead focus on two women who trade plane tickets. But I still wanted a disaster of some kind to lead the world to believe my main character, Claire, was dead. To see what she’d do and whether she could pull it off. Eva started out as a way to accomplish that, but the more I wrote forward in Claire’s POV, the more I realized that Eva also had an important story to tell, and that it dovetailed nicely with Claire’s.

HANK:  You would have been flying around the country on book tour now, sigh. But did writing this change your relationship with airport bars? Waiting areas? Air travel in general?

JULIE CLARK: The last trip I took was in January, to attend ABA’s Winter Institute, which was incredible. Even though the book was finished by that point and well into production, I paid close attention to how things worked, trying to imagine Claire and Eva among the travelers, trying to hide in plain sight. I paid extra attention to gates that felt crowded and chaotic, trying to imagine whether someone might be able to slip out of line….

HANK:  What it would be like to pretend to be someone else--I thought about this a lot, of course, since it's a theme in THE FIRST TO LIE. (Though the books are fascinatingly different.). Anything that you realize about the ease or difficulty of that?

JULIE: It’s really hard today with technology that tracks our every move. Claire had all of Eva’s bank cards, but it was challenging for her to use them because authentication is so inconsistent. Sometimes I need to show my ID when I use a credit card. Other times I don’t. Likewise, the old days of slipping a photo into a driver’s license and laminating over it are long gone! A person who wants a new identity will need to pay a lot of money to some very shady people in order to get one, and even then, there’s no guarantee it’ll be good enough to live without constant fear of discovery. I also was fascinated by the idea of identity…how well do people really know us, and I loved pushing Claire to become more and more immersed in Eva’s life the longer she lived in her house.

HANK:  Oh, yes, so perfectly psychologically insidious.  Did you know the ending before you started?

JULIE:  Yes, I typically know how my books will end very early on. I might not know how I’m going to get there, but I like to have that last chapter/last scene in my mind to work toward. With The Last Flight I knew, almost from the beginning, how it would resolve.

HANK: Have you always wanted to be a writer? How did that happen?

JULIE:  I’ve always written for myself. Not just fiction but journaling and lists and ideas…it’s very therapeutic for me, and something I do every morning immediately after waking up with a large mug of coffee. I didn’t start writing seriously for publication until I was well into my forties though, and didn’t publish my first book until I was 48!


HANK: Got to love that. (I was 55!) So where did you grow up? What books did
you read as a kid? Do you still think about them now?

JULIE:  I grew up in Santa Monica, California. At that time it was a sleepy beach town, and I had a lot of freedom as a teenager. I'd pack a beach bag every morning of summer vacation and walk down to the beach, where I'd hang out with friends, swim in the ocean, and read. I absolutely loved the Trixie Belden mystery series. Anne of Green Gables was also a beloved series I read and re-read over and over again. But I pretty much read everything I could get my hands on.

HANK: Yes! Trixie! And there was one series about Donna Parker—maybe be she was student body president? I learned a lot from her, inI fact. About the benefits of planning ahead.  Anyway--How are you? How has this hideous pandemic changed your life?

JULIE:  It hasn't changed my life too much, other than limiting my ability to grocery shop on a whim. I'm a dedicated introvert, so most of my free time has always been spent puttering around the house, reading, cooking, working on projects. My kids are the same way. So for the three of us, we're just doing more of the same, while being a little extra mindful when we leave the house. It's really impacted my promotion life though. Releasing a book in the middle of a pandemic is not ideal. My book tour was canceled. I lost out on a trip to New York for Book Expo. I am slated to appear at several book festivals throughout the fall, which have all moved online. So it's been a big adjustment, not only in scheduling, but also expectations. The lovely thing about it, though, is that it's allowed people from all over the country (and world) to attend events that never would have been possible had they happened in person. So I see that as a benefit.

HANK  You are so wise, and brave--and there's no question they'll ALL invite you back. (And hey, you DID make the Times list. Hurray!)   And we're delighted you're here today!  Finally: What’s the best or worst advice you’ve ever heard? Or—what would you tell to a new
writer? Or—what have you learned through this?

JULIE: It's cliche, but to publish a book, you really need to write every day. Even if it's only for a couple hours. Staying in that world in your mind every day is so critical. I read somewhere that the best way to publish is to 1) Think of yourself as a worker and 2) Show up at the job. It's literally that simple. And read read read. You don't need an MFA to be a successful novelist. What you need is an ear for how language must sound on the page, for dialogue and pacing. You can get all of that if you read widely, outside of and within your genre. Read brilliant books, but also read the bad ones. That way you can tune your ear for what doesn't work, which is as important as knowing what does. 

HANK: Yes! So agree. (Once you know what doesn't work--just don't do that!) Reds and readers, SO much to still find out from Julie--so ask away. She's West Coast..so she'll be here soon!  And let's all congratulate her. And, reds and readers, remember air travel? What was the last flight you took? 

And a copy of THE LAST FLIGHT to one lucky commenter!



Julie Clark is the New York Times bestselling author of The Last Flight. It has earned starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher's Weekly, Library Journal, and the New York Times has called it "thoroughly absorbing". It's been named an Indie Next Pick, a Library Reads Pick, and a Best Book of 2020 by Amazon Editors and Apple Books. Her debut, The Ones We Choose, was published in 2018 and has been optioned for television by Lionsgate. Julie lives in Los Angeles, where she teaches and writes full time.



        



135 comments:

  1. Congratulations, Julie, on your new book . . . I’m looking forward to reading it. [And congratulations for making the New York Times list!]

    You said you know the end of your story very early in your writing process. Did you have a clear picture of how to get your story to that ending or were there surprises you didn’t expect as the story unfolded?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wait to hear the answer to this! Reading it, it would be very hard to figure out…

      Delete
    2. Thanks so much for reading Joan! I didn't know exactly how I'd get there, only that I knew where and how it would end. Which is sort of like having a tangled knot of string and having to untangle it in order to find the end.

      Delete
  2. Congrats on making the NYT list. I can see why. That premise sounds intriguing.

    And another Trixie Belden fantatic here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a couple of those books in my shelf right now… I am going to take a look at them!

      Delete
    2. I own the entire series, all boxed up in the room behind the garage. I think I I need to let them see light again. The premise for The Last Flight is unique. I remember reading a book about a plane crash where two people having an affair died in the plane crash together . The book was about the spouses left behind and their reaction to the death of their spouse and the affair. The remaining spouses ultimately get together.

      Delete
    3. Wasn't there a Harrison Ford movie like that? Random Hearts. Maybe it was based on the book.

      Delete
  3. Congratulations on the NYT list, Julie! I hope you frame a copy with your book cover, to hang on your office wall.

    The last flight I took was a short hop from Kansas City to Dallas on Southwest. It was cold in KC, so everybody had big, puffy coats, and I was in the last boarding group. I wound up squeezed in between a man and wife who wanted to bicker over the top of me until I begged them to stop. I ended up switching with the wife for the window seat, but still spent the whole flight feeling like a head of cabbage, crated up to send to the grocery store with a whole bunch of other cabbage heads. MOST uncomfortable. I vowed never to fly again until either a) the Feds force the airlines to give people more room or b) I can afford to fly in an earlier boarding group or in a better seating class. I shudder to think what flying would be like now, particularly if people refuse to wear masks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my gosh, that sounds so bleak! The best you could hope would be to get some dialogue from that :-)

      Delete
    2. Or just use the situation to torture your protagonist, I suppose. I complained to Southwest, and was sent a $50 credit toward my next flight, but it has expired, and I have not been moved to fly again.

      Delete
  4. Congratulations, Julie! I'm also a southern Californian girl (Pasadena area) originally, and I'll tell you, my older-person skin is paying for all that beachgoing.

    The book concept is amazing. I look forward to reading this!

    I snuck in a trip to Puerto Rico at the last possible moment before things shut down. My younger on lives and works there, and my older son (who lives in MD) and I decided to converge and visit him. We had three had a delightful visit, went to beaches, stayed a night at the ecofarm where JD works, and flew home on March 9. Gah! I can't imagine getting on an airplane again for a long time.

    But I hear you on the silver lining of people being able to "attend" author events who otherwise wouldn't have been there. I've "met" fans from all over during video gigs.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Congratulations, Julie, on making the NYT list! The Last Flight has an intriguing premise and I will check it out.

    My last flights were on March 17, 2020 from San Diego to Toronto, and then to Ottawa. I was there to attend the abruptly cancelled Left Coast Crime (LCC) 2020 and an extended vacation.
    The City of San Diego had rapidly started shutting down the following weekend and we were being urged to return home by our Prime Minister.

    The flights were about 90% full and there were no precautions. No one wore masks and we sat all crammed together. And there were 100s of us crammed together in a huge line trying to clear customs in Toronto.

    The 4-month period from mid-March to mid-July is the longest time that I have NOT travelled in decades. Canada is one of the dozen+ countries that the EU is allowing entrance to (as of June 30) but I have no particular plans to go there. Although the COVID-19 cases have dramatically dropped in Canada, we still cannot travel to other provinces that I want to go to this summer.

    Oddly, both Air Canada and Westjet have reinstated normal seating again from July 1. They claim their improved HEPA filtration system and cleaning protocols and the fact that everyone has to be masked throughout the flight are enough to keep flyers safe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I have heard that about the filters. Interesting! And my friends who have needed to travel say the planes are quite full. Ahhhh

      Delete
  6. Julie, congratulations on making the NYT list!

    The last flight I took was back when my niece was 9 years old. She'd come up for a summer visit. We drove down to Virginia and she was driven there by her grandmother and mother from Georgia. Then we drove back to Massachusetts.

    The trip was 2 months of hell. By the time it was time to bring her home, there was no way I was going to do another 12 hour plus car trip. So we got plane tickets for her and I and I took her home to Georgia.

    Since then, I haven't had any need to take a plane anywhere since I don't travel much in the first place.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Welcome Julie! and congratulations on the success of this book. I would think it's fairly rare to come up with a high concept that everyone loves, and that holds up as you write the book. Did you set out to come up with a big twist? (and how did you do that?) or did it marvelously appear?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am crossing fingers for the marvelously appear choice. Maybe it will happen to us :-)

      Delete
    2. Twists are hard to craft. The biggest twist in The Last Flight came very late in the process, and was a very late addition. Other twists I knew right away, as the rest of the book hinged on them. For each one, it's different. But you know when a twist is going to work because you get a little zing of excitement when you hit on it.

      Delete
  8. Congrats on the NYT - Woot Woot!

    Hubs is a pilot and until recently we had a plane in the hangar so my last flight doesn't count. My last commercial flight was from the Writer's Police Academy when it was held in Greensboro back to Fort Myers. We had flown ourselves up but were grounded by weather and I had to get back to the day job. It was a last minute flight and I expected (and dreaded) the full TSA experience. Instead, the agent waved me through. Since I was flying all the red flags, last minute one-way ticket, no luggage or carry on I was surprised. Turns out when hubs and I applied to fly to the Bahamas in our plane the documentation required triggered a background check that served as a TSA pre-clearance acceptance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TSA Pre-check! You make me so nostalgic… I remember when that was the joy of my life.

      Delete
  9. Congratulations, Julie! Love, love, love your concept. Especially since I have had ideas similar to that bouncing around in my head. Definitely plan to read this one.

    Not sure when my last flight was, probably the one to CA many, many years ago. Hoping there is no need for me to fly anywhere any time soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can’t decide what to hope… Maybe that air travel becomes superly safe, but you don’t have to go ? Xxxx

      Delete
  10. Congratulations, Julie. What a thrill to see your name and your book on such a prestigious list!

    The last two flights I took were both so uncomfortable that, like Gigi, I vowed to drive instead, unless it were not humanly possible to do so. I'm not especially tall, just 5'6", but if MY knees are touching the seat back in front of me, almost no one is comfortable in those seats.

    One of the last times I flew, the Canadian Volleyball team was on the flight, all very tall people, women and men. One sat next to me, and the poor man had no choice but to "manspread" far into my space, since his legs were so long. He kept apologizing. I asked him why he didn't get an exit row seat, and he said he was one of the most junior members of the team. Needless to say, it was a long flight for both of us.

    One of my daughters is moving out to Portland, Oregon, another 1,500 miles further than she already lives. She flies a lot for work, but she is also a tiny person, 5'4" and about 100 pounds, and she flies business class a lot. She's going to have to come here if we see each other, I guess.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds miserable, Karen. If the airlines take any more space away, they might as well strap us all to standing back boards, and wedge us into place as if we were files in a filing cabinet, or books at the library. Ooops! I hope no airline execs are reading and thinking, "What a great idea!"

      Delete
    2. My exact thoughts, Gigi! We might as well be cattle packed into those horrible trucks. Or on a train to the camps. Travel by plane, something I once loved, has completely lost its appeal.

      Delete
    3. Until you mentioned it, I had no idea we had national volleyball teams in Canada, Karen. They certainly do not get much publicity here, except during the Olympics.

      I am 5'7" and usually ask for aisle seats on flights. Your daughter is fortunate to be able to FLy in business class for work. Us Canadian feds were only allowed to book business class flights that were longer than 9 hours. So I was crammed into economy going on several European trips but I did get the much needed extra space when flying to Beijing.

      Delete
    4. Yes, I have to admit I always paid extra for extra legroom seating. It really made a huge difference.

      Delete
    5. Hank, I don't think we should HAVE to pay extra to fit into airplane seats. That's highway (flyway?) robbery, in my opinion.

      Delete
    6. Thank you Karen...it was a thrill!

      Delete
  11. Congratulations, Julie! The premise made me gasp, too! Also, I love your advice to would be writers. It really is a job and you have to show up every day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So true! I give myself Sundays off for a day of rest, but that doesn't mean the story isn't still cranking in the background.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Jenn...there is really no secret other than sticking with it.

      Delete
  12. OMG, Julie I can hardly wait to read this book! I see it's also available on Audible. What is it like to have someone read your book aloud? Do you have any choice on who the reader will be?

    The last flight I took was several years ago, from Michigan to Florida to visit a friend. It seems like airlines have done all they can to make flying miserable. I had to change planes in Atlanta and the only reason I made it to my plane on time was because I asked for medical assistance because of an autoimmune disease. A nice man in a golf cart whisked me right to the terminal with ten minutes to spare before boarding.

    The worst part of flying for me is the seating. I am tall and claustrophobic. I always get an aisle seat but even for a normal-sized person, those seats are small an uncomfortable. When I stand up to stretch I usually can't stand up without smacking my head on the ceiling. To endure the conditions I put on noise-cancelling headphones and lose myself in a book. Thank God for Kindles and headphones!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, if you look at it the right way, it can’t be a sanctuary. Are used to get so much writing done on airplanes! But when you are crowded, that’s all you can think about, I agree!

      Delete
    2. Yes! Audible sends a sampling of choices of narrators they think will fit. I had three for Claire and three for Eva. What was most important to me was to make sure their voices were distinctly different. I think they did a great job and I hope you enjoy it!

      Delete
  13. Congratulations on The Last Flight which sounds captivating and intriguing. I have not flown in 4 years. I would love to get away and have a real vacation but that will have to wait.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I enjoyed learning about The Last Flight. I am hooked as this is a fascinating story. Congratulations on the novel. I haven't flown for several years. I wish that I could get away and have a change of scene.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Congratulations, Julie, both on the new book and on MAKING THE LIST! I spend my Sunday mornings with my head in the NYT Book Review. That list must make a huge difference in sales, if I am an example as a voracious reader/buyer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ann, off topic, but thank you again for Rochester Refugee. Got an email just now that the masks are in the mail!

      Delete
    2. Yes, it must--we'll hear more about it soon, I bet!

      Delete
    3. Sgt. P -12 days and counting.

      Delete
    4. Love the countdown Gigi!

      And forgot to mention my last flight, Dallas to Rochester, post Bouchercon. Sigh.

      Delete
    5. Elisabeth, we have all sorts of masks but for comfort , the Rochester Refugees ones remain my favorites. These people have done so much good.

      Delete
    6. Thank you Ann! That makes me so happy!

      Delete
  16. Huge congratulations on making The List! Your new book sounds absolutely captivating. I will definitely be checking it out. I haven't been on a plane in quite some time and have no desire to change that anytime soon! Congratulations on your new release, and here's to innumerable sales!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I guess my last flight was with my husband on our trip to Paris during the summer of 2016. We paid extra to fly Premium Economy for a little more comfort on a long flight. It was lovely, and I even got to try out my French language skills before hitting France.

    We didn't know it, but it was to be our last trip (and flight) before Mike got his cancer diagnosis the following March. After that he couldn't be around groups of people because of the danger of infection, so no more air travel.

    This year I had planned to go to Left Coast Crime in San Diego, but I canceled the trip because of . . . well, you know. I was planning to also attend Bouchercon for the first time because it was to be in Sacramento, the area to which I moved this year. But. . . At least that one wouldn't have required air travel.

    I can't imagine when I'll feel safe about flying again.

    Julie, best of luck on your new book. It sounds wonderful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We are all in it together, dear Margie. And that sound like a wonderful memory..xo

      Delete
  18. Congratulations on The Last Flight and on making the NYT list ! I'm looking forward to read this story.
    My last flight was Dallas-Montreal coming back from Bouchercon 2019. I'm not looking forward to flying right now.

    ReplyDelete
  19. My last flight was from Bouchercon last year. Because my airport was closed due wildfires I had to switch to SFO in order to leave on time. The airline couldn't have been more helpful and accommodating. I am not the most seasoned traveler and until my mother's diagnosis of Alzheimer's and moving her to Oregon I traveled maybe once every 3-5 years on a plane. When we moved my mother I traveled a little more often but it was from one small airport to another via either Portland or Seattle. To be honest, what small airports lack the variety of amenities it makes up for less claustrophobic crowds. I was recently waiting for my sister and witness a family hugging an incoming passenger. It took me a minute to figure out that he was in the military, returning home. Nice scene.

    Julie, I wouldn't think it was possible to switch identities in today's technology driven world. I'm looking forward to seeing how you do it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, so difficult--and SO simple! That's what makes the book so fabulous.

      Delete
    2. I know! But here is the thing...once you're through security, they don't ask for your ID again. So really, anyone could switch tickets and no one would be the wiser.

      Delete
    3. Oh, I KNOW!! I absolutely gasped when you wrote that. HOW many times have I flown? I NEVER thought of that.

      Delete
  20. The first and only time I've flown was in high school. I went on an exchange trip to Germany. Very long flight but lots of fun when we got there.
    Congrats on the book! Sounds excellent.

    ReplyDelete
  21. My last flight was to Dublin last April (2019) with my husband. The flight was only half full and we could stretch out in our rows. I wore a mask to help prevent getting a cold and it worked! I didn’t get sick the first week of vacation like I usually did after flying. I’m sure the empty rows around us helped too. It was a wonderful trip.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Congratulations on the list, Julie. The book sounds wonderful.

    Last flight I took was to Dallas last year for Bouchercon. I don't fly much.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Congratulations, Julie! The book is moving up my TBR list. I especially liked your comment in the interview that a successful novelist needs an ear for how language must sound on the page. I think sometimes anymore authors are so anxious to wow us with the big reveal that they forget the words really count.

    We skipped travel for a few years due to pet health, our health, house stuff, etc. so our last trip was a few years ago to Florida to attend our niece's wedding. I was all set to make a trip back there this May to meet the other niece's 3-year old for the first time. Now both of them are expecting. Hoping to get out to see all of those little ones one of these days. Congrats again!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Congratulations, Julie! I love the plot. There are so many directions this story can go and I can't wait to find out what happens. The last plane trip I took was with my husband and my granddaughter last September. We flew from Houston to London to sightsee and celebrate her high school graduation. I have since renewed my Global Entry/TSA PreCheck in hopes of future safe travels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YES! That is optimistic! I do love my precheck/global entry. xooo

      Delete
    2. Thanks Pat! It was really fun to write.

      Delete
  25. 1) I can't WAIT to read THE LAST FLIGHT - what an instantly compelling premise! I've always loved stories about people escaping from their own lives, either sweet, as in movies like The Holiday, or chilling, like Thomas Perry's Jane Whitefield novels.

    2) I am so jealous of writers who come up with concepts that leave everyone gasping! I've never been able to do it.

    3) Thinking about trips in the Before Time is strange and anxiety provoking. Youngest and I went to New York in January. We sat with strangers in a crowded theater! We took the subway! We ate in poorly ventilated restaurants! We crowded around a guide for a UN tour! I loved it, but it feels like we were on a different planet, now.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Congratulations, Julie on the NYT bestseller list and welcome to Jungle Reds! I have been getting glimpses of your book for a while with the previews by bookstagrammers on Instagram who got Advanced Reading Copies. I added it to my reading list. The story reminds me a bit of a movie with Jaclyn Smith fleeing an abusive husband, played by Christopher Reeve.

    Hank, when was the last flight I took? I flew Round Trip from Oakland, CA to San Diego, CA for the Left Coast Crime conference. My last flight was on the 12th of March, hours before the conference was cancelled.

    Wonder if air travel will change in the future?

    Diana

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good question--yeah kind of has to, right? My last flight was Mar 12, too. Palm Beach to Boston. My last book event.

      Delete
    2. Hank, were you surprised that your flight to Boston was Not cancelled?

      Delete
    3. Ah....no, it was not such a situation at the time. There were zero cases in Palm Beach when I was there. I used ten million wipes, though.

      Delete
    4. Thank you! The instagram community and the bookstagram community have been amazing.

      Delete
  27. Congratulations, Julie, on the book and making the NYT list! I am completely hooked and can’t wait to read The Last Flight. I’m glad you didn’t put it away and instead kept working on it.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Julie, congratulations on your book, and on making the NYT list! That definitely is a lifetime thrill! Could you tell us a tiny bit more about the story, without too many spoilers?

    My last flight was coming back from New York in mid-January. I'm horrified now, realizing that the virus was already in the community there. Now I'm wondering when I will be able to fly to London again, which is sort of a necessity for my books... How do you keep a mask on for the whole of a ten hour flight? And even though I'm a small person, and I try to get an aisle seat, lately I seem to have had huge men next to me who man-spread into literally half my seat. I can't imagine doing that now!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe keep them all inside, Debs?

      Delete
    2. It's the story of two women who are desperate to escape their lives...but for very different reasons...both of them running from men who have been taking advantage of them in very different ways.

      Delete

  29. Welcome Julie! and congratulations on the success of this book. What a thrill ! I love the premise. The last flight I took was home from Jacksonville after a trip to Panama...

    ReplyDelete
  30. I loved this book! So glad it is getting the success that it deserves. Thanks for the interview!!

    ReplyDelete
  31. This reminds me of the book DECEPTIONS by Judith Michael (in the 80's). In that book, two twin sisters decides to switch places for a night to see if they can fool their respective husbands. All goes well until one of the twins is killed and the other is left to decide how to proceed.

    Off to order this book now!

    ReplyDelete
  32. My last flight was in August 2019, coming back to Florida from a visit to my home state. I'd planned to go back next month for a reunion, but that has been postponed. I'm not flying anywhere, probably for a long time. The book sounds fascinating, though. It's now on my TBR list!

    ReplyDelete
  33. Congrats on all the success! The book sounds wonderful. It's been a few years since I was last on a plane.

    ReplyDelete

  34. I finished reading The Last Flight Sunday. Fantastic book. It made me think about life. All the praise is well deserved. Haven’t flown for a couple of years. Being only 5 feet tall, the lack of leg room didn’t usually bother me. But, it has definitely gotten worse cause it feels like the seats have shrunk. We are on top of each other. I won’ t fly again until there is a vaccine.

    ReplyDelete

  35. I finished reading The Last Flight Sunday. Fantastic book. It made me think about life. All the praise is well deserved. Haven’t flown for a couple of years. Being only 5 feet tall, the lack of leg room didn’t usually bother me. But, it has definitely gotten worse cause it feels like the seats have shrunk. We are on top of each other. I won’ t fly again until there is a vaccine.

    ReplyDelete
  36. I'm caught and will be checking out the book. Interesting concept, switching places. We did once have a teacher who had appropriated a relative's teaching credentials. His performance and student queries led someone to double check.
    I haven't flown for a good long while, since the airlines have systematically taken the fun out of it. Once in the restroom line (when they would still allow a restroom line), we took a little poll to see who had enough seat room . . . only a 10-year-old girl was comfortable in her seat, and it's just gotten worse since then.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Oh I so want to read this one! 😀👏👏

    ReplyDelete
  38. Last flights was to Burbank, California to visit my daughters. I miss flying on Southwest but because of my age I am happy at home gardening and reading. Miss our local library sales once a month where I always bought tooooo many books but now glad I did as I have a great stack!!!

    ReplyDelete
  39. You need my email so you can tell me when I win!!!

    ReplyDelete
  40. What an amazing premise! Congratulations on making the list, Julie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jennifer! How wonderful to see you! xoxooo

      Delete
    2. By random selection--YOU WIN! Email me your address at h ryan at whdh dot com YAY!!

      Delete
  41. The premise of the book sounds just great, it's on my to read and soon list! And much congratulations on the NYTimes list! My last flight was to Las Vegas a few years ago. My sweetie is afraid of flying, so doses up on anti-anxiety meds before we leave for the airport. Even flying almost across the country from CT, he was still completely loopy when we got to the car rental place. The woman behind the counter getting us the car was clearly having a trying day and just wanted us done so she could have lunch. But, sweetie was so comically loopy that she ended up laughing and upgraded us to a wonderful vehicle. She wished us a pleasant vacation at the Grand Canyon, Zion, etc. And she handed over the keys. . . to me! The air travel? Not as much fun.
    -Melanie

    ReplyDelete
  42. And the WINNER is: Jennifer J Chow! Email me h ryan at whdh dot com with your address! YAY!And see you all tomorrow for a wonderful friend of the reds!

    ReplyDelete